The information in this preliminary prospectus supplement is not complete and may be changed. This preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are not an offer to sell these securities and they are not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(5)
Registration No. 333-190273

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED JANUARY 14, 2014

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT
(To Prospectus dated August 15, 2013)

2,750,000 American Depositary Shares

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

JinkoSolar Holding Co., Ltd.

Representing 11,000,000 Ordinary Shares



 

We are offering 2,750,000 American Depositary Shares, or ADSs. Each ADS represent four ordinary shares, par value US$0.00002 per share.

Concurrently with this offering, we are offering up to US$100.0 million aggregate principal amount of convertible notes in accordance with Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933 to “qualified institutional buyers” (as defined in Rule 144A under the Securities Act) and outside the United States to non-U.S. persons in reliance on Regulation S of the Securities Act, assuming no exercise of the initial purchaser’s over-allotment option (or up to US$115.0 million aggregate principal amount of our convertible notes if the initial purchaser in the convertible notes offering exercises its over-allotment option in full), pursuant to a separate offering memorandum. The offering of shares pursuant to this prospectus is contingent upon the closing of the convertible notes offering, and the concurrent offering of our convertible notes is contingent upon the closing of the offering of the shares hereunder.

Our ADSs are traded on the New York Stock Exchange, or the NYSE, under the symbol “JKS.” On January 14, 2014, the closing sale price of our ADSs on the NYSE was US$36.25 per ADS.

Investing in our ADSs involves a high degree of risk. Before buying any ADSs, you should read the discussion of material risks of investing in our ADSs in “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-28.

Neither the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

   
  Per ADS   Total
Public offering price     US$         US$    
Underwriting discounts and commissions     US$         US$    
Proceeds, before expenses, to us     US$         US$    

The underwriter may also purchase up to an additional 412,500 ADSs at the public offering price, less the underwriting discounts and commissions, if any, within 30 days of the date of this prospectus supplement. If the underwriter exercises this option in full, the total underwriting discounts and commissions will be US$    , and our total proceeds, before expenses, will be US$    .

The underwriter is offering the ADSs as set forth under “Underwriting.” Delivery of the ADSs will be made on or about            , 2014.

Credit Suisse

The date of this prospectus supplement is            , 2014.


 
 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

 
  Page
About This Prospectus Supplement     S-1  
Special Note on Forward-Looking Statements     S-3  
Summary     S-5  
The Offering     S-22  
Summary Consolidated Financial and Operating Data     S-24  
Risk Factors     S-28  
Use of Proceeds     S-66  
Capitalization     S-67  
Dividend Policy     S-68  
Exchange Rate Information     S-69  
 

 
  Page
Market Price Information For Our American Depositary Shares     S-70  
Underwriting     S-71  
Taxation     S-77  
Where You Can Find Additional Information     S-84  
Incorporation of Documents by Reference     S-85  
Legal Matters     S-86  
Experts     S-86  
Index to Unaudited Interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements     F-1  

  

PROSPECTUS

 
About This Prospectus     1  
Incorporation of Documents by Reference     2  
Special Note on Forward-Looking Statements     3  
Our Company     5  
Risk Factors     5  
Use of Proceeds     6  
Ratio of Earnings to Fixed Charges and Preferred Share Dividends     6  
Description of the Securities     7  
 

 
Description of Share Capital     8  
Description of American Depositary Shares     19  
Plan of Distribution     28  
Taxation     30  
Enforceability of Civil Liabilities     30  
Legal Matters     32  
Experts     32  
Where You Can Find More Information About Us     33  

  



 

You should rely only on the information contained in this document or to which we have referred you. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with information that is different. This document may only be used where it is legal to sell these securities. The information in this document may only be accurate on the date of this document.

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

This prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are part of a registration statement that we filed with the SEC using a “shelf” registration process. Under the shelf registration process, from time to time, we may sell any combination of the securities described in the accompanying prospectus in one or more offerings, subject in certain cases to the receipt of regulatory approval. This document is in two parts. The first part is the prospectus supplement, which describes the specific terms of this offering of our ADSs and supplements information contained in the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into the accompanying prospectus. The second part consists of the accompanying prospectus, which gives more general information about us and the securities we may offer from time to time under our shelf registration statement, some of which may not be applicable to this offering. If the description of the offering varies between this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information in this prospectus supplement.

You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We have not, and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC has not, authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. We are not, and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC is not, making an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference is accurate only as of their respective dates. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since those dates.

In this prospectus supplement, unless otherwise indicated or unless the context otherwise requires,

“we,” “us,” “our company,” “our” or “JinkoSolar” refer to JinkoSolar Holding Co., Ltd., a Cayman Islands holding company, its current and former subsidiaries for the relevant periods;
“ADRs” refers to the American depositary receipts evidencing our American depositary shares;
“ADSs” refers to our American depositary shares;
“CE” refers to CE certification, a verification of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance issued by SGS Taiwan Ltd. certifying compliance with the principal protection requirement of directive 2004/108/EC of the European Union and EN61000-6-3:2001+A11:2004 and EN61000-6-1:2001 standards;
“CQC” refers to the certificate issued by China Quality Certification Centre certifying that our solar modules comply with IEC61215:2005 and IEC61730-2:2004 standards;
“Euro” refers to the legal currency of the European Union;
“JET” refers to the certificate issued by Japan Electrical Safety & Environment Technology Laboratories certifiying that our modules comply with IEC61215: 2005, IEC61730-1: 2004 and IEC61730-2 :2004 standards;
“Jiangxi Desun” refers to Jiangxi Desun Energy Co., Ltd., an entity in which our founders and substantial shareholders, Xiande Li, Kangping Chen and Xianhua Li, each holds more than 10%, and collectively hold 73%, of the equity interest; Jiangxi Desun’s financial results were consolidated into our financial statements from June 6, 2006 to July 28, 2008;
“Jiangxi Jinko” refers to Jinko Solar Co., Ltd., our wholly-owned operating subsidiary incorporated in the PRC;
“JIS Q 8901” refers to the certificate for the Japanese market from TUV that demonstrates that a company’s management system ensures the highest standards of reliability in their products;
“kWh” refers to kilowatt-hour(s);
“MCS” refers to MCS certificate of factory production control issued by British Approvals Board for Telecommunications certifying that the production management system of our certain types of solar panels complies with MCS005 Issue 2.3 and MCS010 Issue 1.5 standards;

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“NYSE” refers to the New York Stock Exchange;
“PRC” or “China” refers to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for purposes of this prospectus supplement and the accompany prospectus, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau;
“RMB” or “Renminbi” refers to the legal currency of China;
“Topoint” refers to Zhejiang Topoint Photovoltaic Co., Ltd., Zhejiang Yutai Photovoltaic Material Co., Ltd., Zhejiang Weishida Photovoltaic Material Co., Ltd., and Zhejiang Jiutai New Energy Co., Ltd., collectively;
“TÜV” refers to TÜV certificates, issued by TÜV Rheinland Product Safety GmbH certifying that certain types of our solar modules comply with IEC 61215:2005, EN 61215:2005, IEC 61730-1:2004, IEC 61730-2:2004, EN 61730-1:2007 and EN 61730-2:2007 standards;
“UL” refers to the certificate issued by Underwriters Laboratories Inc., to certify that certain types of our solar modules comply with its selected applicable standards;
“US$,” “dollars” or “U.S. dollars” refers to the legal currency of the United States;
“watt” or “W” refers to the measurement of total electrical power, where “kilowatt” or “kW” means one thousand watts, “megawatts” or “MW” means one million watts and “gigawatt” or “GW” means one billion watts; and
“Zhejiang Jinko” refers to Zhejiang Jinko Solar Co., Ltd., formerly Zhejiang Sun Valley Energy Application Technology Co., Ltd., a solar cell supplier incorporated in the PRC which has been our wholly-owned subsidiary since June 30, 2009.

Discrepancies in any table between the amounts identified as total amounts and the sum of the amounts listed therein are due to rounding.

We publish our consolidated financial statements in Renminbi. The conversion of Renminbi into U.S. dollars in this prospectus supplement is solely for the convenience of readers. The exchange rate refers to the exchange rate as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of the Federal Reserve Board. Unless otherwise noted, all translations from Renminbi to U.S. dollars and from U.S. dollars to Renminbi in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus were made at a rate of RMB6.1200 to US$1.00, the noon buying rate in effect as of September 30, 2013. The Renminbi is not freely convertible into foreign currency. We make no representation that any Renminbi or U.S. dollar amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars or Renminbi, as the case may be, at any particular rate, the rates stated below, or at all. On January 10, 2014, the exchange rate, as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of the Federal Reserve Board, was RMB6.0519 to US$1.00.

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SPECIAL NOTE ON FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the information incorporated herein by reference include “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of, and intended to qualify for the safe harbor from liability established by, the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements, which are not statements of historical fact, may contain estimates, assumptions, projections expectations or any combination of the above regarding future events, which may or may not occur. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “should,” “will,” “would,” or similar expressions, including their negatives. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements relating to our expectations and beliefs regarding:

general economic conditions;
the worldwide demand for electricity and the market for environmentally friendly power generation, and photovoltaic, or PV, energy in particular;
the effects of environmental regulation and long-term fossil fuel supply constraints;
government support, government subsidies and economic incentives to the solar power industry;
the acceleration of adoption of PV technologies;
the price trends of silicon wafers, solar cells, solar modules and our raw materials;
the advantages of our business model and the competitiveness of our products;
the scaling and expansion of our production capacity;
our ability to maintain and expand our existing customer base;
our current and potential joint venture enterprises and other strategic investments;
our ability to successfully implement our strategies, including our ability to successfully develop PV projects;
advancements in our process technologies and cost savings from such advancements;
our ability to secure raw materials in the future;
our ability to secure sufficient funds to meet our cash needs for our operations and capacity expansion;
our future business development, results of operations and financial condition;
competition from other manufacturers of silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules, other renewable energy systems and conventional energy suppliers; and
PRC government policies regarding foreign investments.

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Market data and certain industry forecasts used in or incorporated into this prospectus supplement were obtained from internal surveys, market research, publicly available information and industry publications. Industry publications generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness of such information is not guaranteed. Similarly, internal surveys, industry forecasts and market research, while believed to be reliable, have not been independently verified, and neither we nor the underwriter make any representation as to the accuracy of such information.

The forward-looking statements and any related statements made in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference are made as of the date of the respective documents. The forward-looking statements obtained from third-party studies or reports are made as of the date of the corresponding study or report. We undertake no obligation, beyond that required by law, to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which the statement is made, even though circumstances may change in the future.

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SUMMARY

The following summary contains information about us and the offering. It may not contain all of the information that may be important to you in making an investment decision. For a more complete understanding of us and the offering, we urge you to read this entire prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus carefully, including the “Risk Factors” section and the documents incorporated by reference, including our financial statements and the notes to those statements contained in such documents.

Our Business

We are a global leader in the PV industry based in Jiangxi and Zhejiang Provinces in China. We have built a vertically integrated solar power product value chain, from recovering silicon materials to manufacturing solar modules and solar project development. We sell most of our solar modules under our own “JinkoSolar” brand, with a small portion of solar modules on an OEM basis. We also sell silicon wafers and solar cells not used in our solar module production. Leveraging our expertise in manufacturing high quality solar modules and our experience in the PV industry, we also develop PV projects in China and provide solar system integration services. As of December 31, 2013, our share of completed solar projects amounted to 213 MW, with annual power generation capacity approaching 324 million kWh.

We sell our products in major export markets and China. We have established subsidiaries in a number of strategic markets, including Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Canada, the United States, Japan, Australia, India and South Africa, to conduct sales, marketing and brand development for our products in Europe and around the world. We also opened offices in and began to ship our products to Japan and South Africa in 2013. As of December 31, 2013, we had an aggregate of more than 250 customers for our solar modules globally, including distributors, project developers and system integrators.

Our solar modules utilize advanced solar technologies. All of our solar modules sold in Europe are CE, TÜV, and MCS certified, all of our solar modules sold in Japan are JET certified, all of our solar modules sold in North America are UL certified and our monocrystalline solar modules sold in China are CQC certified. In 2013, our solar modules passed TÜV Nord's Dust & Sand Certification Test, demonstrating their suitability for installation in desert regions. We also unveiled our “Eagle II” solar modules, which represent a new standard for performance and reliability. The “Eagle II” solar modules can reach peak power output of approximately 260 to 270 watts for a 60-cell module. We have also begun research on our “Eagle+” solar modules, which will be composed of multicrystalline cells that reached conversion efficiencies of approximately 18.5% in lab tests by a third party.

We leverage our vertically integrated platform and cost-efficient manufacturing capabilities in China to produce high quality products and develop projects at competitive costs. Our solar cell and silicon wafer operations support our solar module production, which further supports our project development business, reducing our overall procurement costs. As of December 31, 2013, we had annual capacity of approximately 1.5 GW each for silicon ingots, wafers and solar cells and approximately 2.0 GW for solar modules. Our manufacturing facilities are located in Shangrao, Jiangxi Province and Haining, Zhejiang Province, providing convenient and timely access to key resources and suppliers.

Our experienced solar projects team is well-equipped to take advantage of attractive downstream solar project opportunities in China and globally. We believe that we have both developed and currently own, operate and maintain the largest aggregate capacity of projects in China, among solar companies publicly listed in the United States. In 2011, we began developing projects, as one of the first movers in downstream solar development in China. As of December 31, 2013, our share of completed solar projects amounted to 213 MW. All of our connected projects qualify for feed-in-tariffs of RMB1.00 to RMB1.05 per kWh for 20 years. We have another approximately 1,100 MW of projects currently under evaluation in our project pipeline. Our projects under evaluation include approximately 700 MW of utility scale projects and 400 MW of rooftop projects, as well as 300 to 400 MW of projects in various stages of permitting and expected to connect to grid in 2014. Our procurement costs for our solar projects are low, as we use our own solar modules and source other components through our extensive industry contacts. We also have a dedicated operations and maintenance team and enjoy low operating and maintenance costs for our solar projects.

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As one of the earliest solar developers in China, we have strong local strategic relationships with local governments and financial institutions, such as China Development Bank, a PRC policy bank that funds large infrastructure projects. These relationships increase our access to local projects and improve our ability to secure permits for, construct and complete our solar projects. In March 2013, we entered into loan facilities for an aggregate principal amount of RMB360 million (US$58.8 million) with a term of 15 years with China Development Bank. We have also entered into a strategic cooperation agreement with China Development Bank, which has stipulated its intention to provide up to US$1.0 billion in financing for development of overseas projects from 2013 through 2017. On January 6, 2014, we entered into another loan facility for an aggregate principal amount of RMB400 million (US$65.3 million) also for a term of 15 years with China Development Bank for the development of three PV projects in Xinjiang and Qinghai provinces of the PRC with a total capacity of 50MW.

Our Competitive Strengths

We believe that the following strengths enable us to compete successfully in the PV industry:

We have developed a vertically integrated manufacturing and project development platform.

We are a global leader in the PV industry. Since our inception in June 2006, we have developed a vertically integrated solar product value chain, from manufacturing solar products, such as silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules, to solar project development.

Our in-house annual production capacity for silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules grew from approximately 300 MW, 150 MW and 150 MW, respectively, as of December 31, 2009 to 600 MW each as of December 31, 2010 to approximately 1.2 GW each as of December 31, 2011 and 2012 to approximately 1.5 GW, 1.5 GW and 2.0 GW, respectively, as of December 31, 2013.

Beginning on January 16, 2014, we began operating the restructured manufacturing assets of Topoint under an operating lease agreement, including 500 MW capacity for silicon wafers, 500 MW for PV cells and 100 MW for PV modules. Topoint is a high-tech PV manufacturer with production and research and development facilities in the Huangwan Industry Park in Haining, Zhejiang Province. We were selected to operate Topoint’s assets in light of our extensive operating experience, solid balance sheet and reputation for advanced technology. Under the operating lease agreement, we will operate Topoint's manufacturing assets until the completion of Topoint's reorganization. We intend to take ownership of Topoint and continue to operate the manufacturing assets after the reorganization.

In 2011, we began to develop solar projects and, as of December 31, 2013, our share of completed solar projects amounted to 213 MW. All of our connected projects qualify for recurring feed-in-tariffs of RMB1.00 to RMB1.05 per kWh for 20 years.

Our vertically integrated manufacturing and product development platform is designed to provide more efficient production, shorter product development cycles, better quality control, lower costs and increased access to end customers. Our procurement costs for our solar projects are low, as we use our own solar modules and source other components through our extensive industry contacts. We also have a dedicated operations and maintenance team and enjoy low operating and maintenance costs for our solar projects. We can provide our customers with comprehensive and tailored solar project development solutions, from project origination to providing our PV products, construction and operations and maintenance. As a vertically integrated manufacturer and project developer, we have incrementally captured revenue and profit at each point of the PV industry value chain, thereby reducing the volatility of our earnings. We have positioned ourselves to maintain or improve our overall profit margin to take advantage of the growing PV industry in diverse industry conditions.

Our high-quality products increase our sales and enhance our brand recognition.

We have substantial expertise in manufacturing PV products and developing solar projects. Our research and development team, consisting of 130 experienced researchers and engineers as of December 31, 2013, including 106 experienced engineers in the Shangrao Economic Development Zone and 24 experienced engineers in Zhejiang Province, has improved our manufacturing efficiency and the quality of our products, and developed next-generation PV technology. Our PV multicrystalline cell average conversion efficiency increased from 17.6% as of December 31, 2012 to 17.9% as of December 31, 2013.

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Our solar modules meet the industry’s highest performance ratios. All of our solar modules sold in Europe are CE, TÜV, and MCS certified, all of our solar modules sold in Japan are JET certified, all of our solar modules sold in North America are UL certified and our monocrystalline solar modules in China are CQC certified. In May 2012, we began selling our high-efficiency “WING” series modules. The power output of a 60-cell polycrystalline solar module can reach up to 265 W with a conversion efficiency of 16.2%. The modules are potential induced degradation free, or PID-free, and can withstand high temperature and extreme humidity. In January 2013, we introduced the world’s first PID-free modules to be certified under weather conditions of 85 degrees Celsius and 85% relative humidity, the “Eagle II” series. We have also begun research on our “Eagle+” solar modules, which will be composed of multicrystalline cells reached conversion efficiencies of approximately 18.5% in lab tests by a third party. We believe the high quality of our products will continue to enhance our brand recognition among our customers and in the industry.

Our manufacturing capabilities include advanced production equipment, proprietary intellectual property and strict quality control procedures. We procure our production equipment from leading domestic and international vendors and leverage our proprietary know-how and technology to improve the quality of our products and reduce our costs. We also operate in accordance with ISO 9001 quality management standards.

We enforce strict quality control procedures, including incoming, in-process and output inspections. Our lab was UL Witness Test Data Program-certified and meets the industry’s highest standards for performance and reliability. In July 2012, we were selected as a finalist for the “Solar Projects in North America” category of the Intersolar Award 2012, which is presented each year to award innovation in the international solar industry. In 2013, we were awarded the Solar Industry Award for Module Manufacturing Innovation, recognizing our innovation in manufacturing.

Our strong pipeline and strategic partnerships with leading Chinese institutions position us to rapidly grow our downstream business.

We were one of the first movers in downstream solar development in China. We believe that we have developed the largest aggregate capacity of projects in China, among solar companies publicly listed in the United States. We have approximately 1,100 MW of projects currently under evaluation in our project pipeline. Our projects under evaluation include approximately 700 MW of utility scale projects and 400 MW of rooftop projects, as well as 300 to 400 MW of projects in various stages of permitting and expected to connect to grid in 2014.

China has recently seen a number of favorable developments in the downstream PV business, including increased targets for solar power capacity, the standardization of solar subsidy payment methods, increased funding for subsidy payments and new subsidies for distributed-generation-connected projects. As one of the earliest solar developers in China, we are well-positioned to take advantage of the increasingly positive landscape.

We have strong local strategic relationships with local governments and financial institutions, including China Development Bank. These relationships increase our access to local projects and improve our ability to secure permits for, construct and complete our solar projects. In March 2013, we entered into loan facilities for an aggregate principal amount of RMB360 million (US$58.8 million) with a term of 15 years with China Development Bank to develop PV projects. The long credit term provided by China Development Bank substantially reduces the risks associated with selling electricity to grid over a long investment horizon. We have also entered into a strategic cooperation agreement with China Development Bank, which has stipulated its intention to provide financing of up to US$1.0 billion for overseas project development from 2013 through 2017. On January 6, 2014, we entered into another loan facility for an aggregate principal amount of RMB400 million (US$65.3 million) also for a term of 15 years with China Development Bank for development of three PV projects in Xinjiang and Qinghai provinces of the PRC with a total capacity of 50MW.

We have developed long-standing relationships with a leading, diversified and international customer base.

We have established a global sales and distribution platform for our solar products to improve marketing and build our customer base. We sell our solar modules through 12 overseas subsidiaries. We also selectively use sales agents and distributors to expand our overseas footprint with reduced overhead costs. As of

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December 31, 2013, we had more than 250 customers for our solar modules from China and 38 other countries, including Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Canada, the United States, Japan, Singapore, Australia, India and South Africa. We opened our Japan office and began to ship products to South Africa in 2013. Our module customers include leading players in the PV industry, such as Enel Green Power, BayWa r.e. Solarsysteme GmbH, AMEC, the Juwi Group, Energiebau Solarstrom System GmbH, WBHO Build Energy (Pty) Ltd, Solar Century Holding Ltd and Solairedirect S.A.

The high quality of our products and after-sales services have helped improve existing customer relationships and develop new customer relationships, thereby improving the predictability of our earnings. Our experienced local teams solicit product feedback and provide localized customer services from 19 overseas offices with a prompt response time. We work closely with customers expanding to new emerging markets, which also allows us to cost-effectively introduce our products to new regions. We also highlight our relationships with our customers who are local leaders in the solar industry to increase our overall reputation to the market.

We have operated and grown our business while maintaining a competitive cost structure.

We have leveraged our industry relationships and expertise in the PV industry to operate and grow our business at a low cost. Our gross margins were among the highest for Chinese solar companies publicly listed in the United States in the first, second and the third quarter of 2013. We have had relatively low operating expenses, in light of our revenue growth. We were profitable in 2011, in spite of challenging conditions in the solar industry and losses recorded by the large majority of publicly listed solar companies. We were also among the first companies in the industry to return to net profitability after the economic downturn, in the second and third quarter of 2013, as average selling prices began to stabilize.

We believe we enjoy relatively low equipment costs, as we purchased high-quality equipment from solar products manufacturers exiting the industry in the first half of 2013. We also recorded low depreciation per watt relative to our vertically-integrated peers, based on the public filings of such companies. We have also acquired substantial land reserves and land-use rights for future production capacity expansion. We believe that our substantial land reserves, high utilization ratio and ability to expand capacity at relatively low costs have prepared us to take advantage of any future growth of the solar industry. According to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP’s 2012 Photovoltaic Sustainable Growth Index, we ranked fourth among the largest publicly traded solar companies around the world based on growth performance and financial and operational efficiency.

We manufacture our solar products in Shangrao, Jiangxi Province and Haining, Zhejiang Province, China to support our low-cost manufacturing operations. As a fast-growing manufacturing company located in the Shangrao Economic Development Zone, we enjoy favorable government policies, including preferential pricing for land, grants for production equipment investments and financial assistance for recruitment, as well as low electricity costs. The close proximity of our facilities to Zhejiang and Jiangsu Provinces, two of the most economically developed provinces in eastern China, provides us with convenient and timely access to our key resources and suppliers, as well as easy access to skilled labor at competitive costs.

We procure our production equipment from leading domestic and international vendors and leverage our proprietary know-how and technology to improve the quality of our products and reduce our costs. For example, our furnace reloading technology allows us to increase the size of our ingots while lowering our unit production costs by increasing the production output of our furnaces and reducing the consumption of consumables and electricity. Our sophisticated wire saws currently enable us to produce monocrystalline wafers with an average thickness of 180 microns and multicrystalline wafers with an average thickness of 200 microns, reducing the amount of silicon raw material used to produce our wafer products. In addition, we have developed proprietary process technologies and know-how allowing us to process and recover silicon materials outside of the customary range in relation to certain electrical characteristics, while ensuring the consistent quality of our products.

We use 10 automated production lines for the production of solar modules, in addition to our 76 manual production lines, which enables us to reduce human error and labor cost, enhance efficiency and gain a competitive advantage over competitors who do not use automated production lines. In addition, we have made comprehensive improvements to our solar cell production lines, production process, production

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management and quality control process, which has improved the conversion efficiency of our solar cells and increased the percentage of solar cells meeting our quality standards.

We continue to reduce our production costs by improving solar cell conversion efficiency and enhancing manufacturing yields. In 2011, we successfully developed Quantum-1 solar modules, which combine the benefits of mono- and multi-crystalline solar modules to achieve a higher efficiency than multi-crystalline solar modules, while maintaining lower production costs than monocrystalline solar modules. We have long-term relationships with top domestic and international producers to mitigate the impact of potential tariffs and ensure conversion efficiency and module quality. We also enjoy significant cost advantages by sourcing the majority of our polysilicon through spot pricing, thereby reducing the risk of being bound to high-priced long-term polysilicon contracts.

Our strong management and experienced solar projects team are well-equipped to drive the expansion of our business in diverse economic conditions.

We have a strong management team led by our chairman Mr. Xiande Li and chief executive officer Mr. Kangping Chen, who have proven expertise in the solar industry, corporate management and the development and execution of growth strategies. Mr. Xiande Li and Mr. Xianhua Li, the founders of our company, have over 16 years of aggregate experience in the solar industry. Mr. Kangping Chen has more than 17 years of experience in the management and operation of solar businesses and other manufacturing businesses.

Under their leadership, we have been able to quickly expand our business from processing recoverable silicon materials in 2006. We began producing monocrystalline ingots in 2007, monocrystalline wafers and multicrystalline ingots and wafers in 2008 and solar cells and solar modules in 2009. We began solar project development in 2011. We have also been able to rapidly grow our production capacity in a cost-efficient manner. In addition, our management team has demonstrated their ability to respond to the market changes promptly, sustaining our growth even in the face of economic uncertainty. We believe that our management team possesses the insight, vision and knowledge required to effectively execute our growth strategy in the face of challenging economic conditions.

Our experienced solar projects team of over 100 employees is well-equipped to take advantage of attractive downstream solar project opportunities in China and globally. We have recruited highly experienced solar projects team members from leading companies in the solar industry, the construction industry and other energy sectors. They have demonstrated their strong capabilities at all stages of solar project development, including permit application, feasibility study, engineering, purchase and construction, financing and operations and maintenance.

Our Strategies

In order to achieve our goal of becoming a leading vertically integrated solar company, we intend to pursue the following principal strategies:

Grow our downstream solar development business to diversify our revenue, improve profitability and increase the predictability of our earnings.

We plan to grow our downstream solar development business to diversify our revenue, improve profitability and increase the predictability of our earnings. We have approximately 1,100 MW of projects currently under evaluation in our project pipeline. Our projects under evaluation include approximately 700 MW of utility scale projects and 400 MW of rooftop projects, as well as 300 to 400 MW of projects in various stages of permitting and expected to connect to grid in 2014.

We will leverage our access to solar modules and experience and relationships in the solar industry to explore new opportunities as an independent power producer. We believe that growing our solar plant business will also improve our reputation in the solar market. We plan to meet the working capital requirements of our solar project development by improving our financing capabilities, including through our operations and proceeds from this offering and our concurrent convertible senior notes offering.

We plan to focus primarily on projects in China, where we have our strongest local relationships and deepest market understanding, but we will selectively explore potential opportunities in overseas projects. We

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have also entered into a strategic cooperation agreement with China Development Bank, which has stipulated its intention to provide financing of up to US$1.0 billion for overseas project development from 2013 through 2017.

Expand capacity opportunistically and in a cost-efficient manner.

We enjoy high utilization rates for our current production lines. We will continue to monitor our customers’ short-term and long-term demands to opportunistically expand our production capacity. During the global economic crisis, despite challenging capital markets, our in-house annual production capacity for silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules grew from approximately 600 MW each as of December 31, 2010 to approximately 1.5 GW each for silicon ingots, wafers and solar cells and approximately 2.0 GW for solar modules as of December 31, 2013. Additionally, we believe that our operation and proposed future acquisition of Topoint’s manufacturing assets will help us address the growing demands of our strong international customer base. We have also acquired substantial land reserves and land-use rights for future production capacity expansion. We will continue to leverage our industry relationships and expertise in the PV industry to source high-quality production equipment at low costs. We will also continue to manage our accounts payable terms with our manufacturers to manage our working capital. We believe that we are ready to respond to increased demand for our solar products by strategically expanding our capacity in a cost-efficient manner.

Enhance our procurement and research and development capabilities to reduce our average costs and improve product quality.

We believe that secure and cost-efficient access to silicon raw material supplies is critical to our future success. We will continue to purchase solar grade virgin polysilicon from both domestic and foreign suppliers. We plan to purchase our virgin polysilicon primarily through spot market purchases to take advantage of decreasing virgin polysilicon prices. We will continue to source our raw materials from high-quality suppliers. In 2012, our five largest suppliers of our silicon materials provided approximately 63.2% of our total silicon purchases by value.

We also believe that the continual improvement of our research and development capability is vital to maintaining our long-term competitiveness. In 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, our research and development expenses were approximately RMB31.6 million, RMB30.0 million, RMB69.0 million and RMB36.1 million, respectively. We plan to enhance our research and development capability by recruiting additional experienced engineers specialized in the PV industry. Our senior management lead our research and development efforts and set the strategy for improving our products and manufacturing processes. We intend to continue to devote management and financial resources to research and development.

Our research and development laboratories, located in the Shangrao Economic Development Zone in Jiangxi Province and in Haining, Zhejiang Province, focus on enhancing the quality of our silicon wafers and solar modules, improving production efficiency and increasing the conversion efficiency of our silicon wafers and solar modules. We have entered into a cooperative agreement with Nanchang University in Jiangxi Province, China and established a joint PV materials research center on the campus of Nanchang University to improve our manufacturing processes and develop new materials and technologies. The research center also provides on-site technical support to us and training for our employees, as well as assisting in the improvement of the conversion efficiency, production process and overall quality of our solar products.

Selectively grow our sales and marketing network.

We are prepared to identify attractive new opportunities in mature and emerging markets and selectively expand our sales and marketing network to regions with high government incentives and high demand for solar energy. We will strive to increase recognition of our brand domestically and internationally. China, Japan and the United States are expected to drive demand growth and account for 61% of global demand for solar modules in 2014. China is expected to install 12 GW in 2014. As the PV market becomes increasingly competitive, we plan to devote more resources to the expansion of our sales and marketing network and the enhancement of our sales and marketing channels.

We have established subsidiaries in North America, Europe and Asia to conduct sales, marketing and brand development. We may establish similar subsidiaries in new emerging markets to expand our customer

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base and market penetration. For example, we opened our offices and began selling products to Japan and South Africa in 2013. Furthermore, we have diversified our geographic exposure in recent years. For example, the percentage of our total revenue from solar module sales changed from from 63.8% for Europe, 28.3% for China, 1% for Africa, 4.8% for Americas and 3.0% for other Asia-Pacific countries for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to 42.9% for China, 21.1% for Europe, 18.8% for other Asia-Pacific countries, 10.6% for Africa and 6.0% for Americas for the same period in 2013.

We also plan to continue to devote significant resources to develop a stable end-user customer base by establishing diversified sales channels through project developers, system integrators, distributors and sales agents. We also plan to participate in diverse marketing activities, including advertising on major industry publications, attending trade shows and exhibits worldwide, in addition to providing our high quality customer service. We intend to strategically leverage our sales force and distribution network to cost-effectively expand our sales and marketing footprint. In August 2012, we launched the JinkoSolar Priority Solar Club partner program for our strategic customers to further drive our module sales and reward customer loyalty. In 2012 and 2013, we attended 27 and 40 exhibitions and conferences in the PV industry globally, respectively.

Establish and strengthen our brand and customer relationships.

We believe our ability to establish and maintain long-term customer relationships for our solar cells and solar modules is critical to our continued business development. Since our inception, we have established a reputation for providing our customers with high quality PV products at competitive prices. As we extend our product line downstream, expand our production capacity and increase our operation scale, we intend to strengthen our brand. To achieve this, we plan to take the following initiatives:

continue to provide our customers with high quality products and services by further improving our manufacturing process, strengthening quality control and increasing the level of vertical integration;
increase our brand awareness among major players in the PV industry by strengthening our marketing efforts and sales to such customers;
extend our distribution network globally in a flexible and practical manner and establish our presence in key markets; and
strengthen our solar project development capabilities and provide tailored solar project development services.

Recent Industry Developments

In recent years, the solar market in China has grown rapidly to become one of the largest solar market in the world, primarily due to increasing demand for electricity and increasing government incentives. Due in part to China’s economic boom and urbanization, China’s electricity demands have also grown sharply. In July 2011, the Chinese government announced its national feed-in-tariff policy. Certain provinces, such as Jiangsu, Liaoning and Shandong, also adopted their own feed-in-tariff policies. As a result, the solar market in Ningxia, Jiangsu and Gansu Provinces have grown particularly quickly, with Jiangsu representing almost half of new installations of recent building-mount projects.

The following represent key recent developments in the market in China:

Anti-Dumping Settlement with the European Union — On July 27, 2013, EU and Chinese trade negotiators announced that a price undertaking had been reached pursuant to which Chinese manufacturers, including JinkoSolar, would limit their exports of solar panels to the EU and set prices above a minimum price, in exchange for the EU agreeing to forgo the imposition of anti-dumping duties on these solar panels from China. The offer was approved by the European Commission on August 2, 2013. The China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Machinery and Electronic Product (CCCME) is responsible for allocating the quota among Chinese export producers. JinkoSolar has been allocated a portion of the quota. Solar panels imported exceeding the annual quota will be subject to anti-dumping duties.

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On December 5, 2013, the European Council announced its final decision imposing definitive anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on imports of crystalline silicon PV cells and modules originating from or consigned from China. An average duty of 47.7%, consisting of the anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties, will be applied for a period of two years beginning on December 6, 2013 to Chinese solar panel exporters who cooperated with the European Commission’s investigations. On the same day, the European Commission announced its decision to confirm the acceptance of the price undertaking offered by Chinese export producers, including JinkoSolar, with CCCME in connection with the anti-dumping proceeding and to extend the price undertaking to the anti-subsidy proceeding, which will exempt them from both anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties.

New Targets for Solar Power Capacity — In response to the increased pace of market development, China’s State Council, in a statement dated July 4, 2013, announced that installed capacity for solar electricity is expected to reach more than 35 GW by 2015 at a growth rate of about 10 GW a year between now and then, and to reach more than 100 GW by 2020. This was the fourth revision in less than three years for the 2015 installed capacity target, which was originally set at 5 GW in 2010, but increased to 10 GW in May 2011, 15 GW in December 2011 and 21 GW in July 2012.

On July 4, 2013, China’s State Council also described principles promoting the PV industry through (i) the exploration of the distributed PV power generation market, (ii) the improvement to the grid connection management and service, in particular for PV power generation, (iii) the improvement to pricing and subsidy policies and development of fund for renewable energy and (iv) support from the financial institutions to the PV industry, among other matters.

Solar Subsidy Payments Standardized — Although solar project development in China began to accelerate rapidly several years ago, there have been concerns about the timely payment of renewable subsidies to project developers since 2011. As a result, independent power producers experienced long accounts receivable periods. However, in March 2012, the National Development and Reform Commission, or the NDRC, the National Energy Commission and the Ministry of Finance, or the MOF, jointly issued a measure to standardize settlement of feed-in tariffs.

In addition, according to a notice issued in July 2013 by the MOF, beginning in August 2013, subsidy payments for distributed PV power generation stations (excluding distributed PV power generation projects) shall be allocated directly from the central MOF to the State Grid Corporation of China and the China Southern Power Grid Co., Ltd., rather than to the provincial financial department. The Interim Measures for the Administration of Distributed PV Power Generation Projects promulgated by National Energy Commission, which became effective on November 18, 2013, further provides that grid companies shall make subsidy payments to project companies on a monthly basis for distributed PV power generation projects which are entitled to subsidy treatments.

Increased Funding for Subsidy Payments — The MOF has proposed to almost double the renewable surcharge for electricity end-users from RMB0.008 per kW to RMB0.015 per kW, effective September 25, 2013.
Distributed-Generation-Connected Projects Receive New Subsidies — On August 30, 2013, the Department of Price of the NDRC released subsidy details for projects. Transmission-grid-connected projects will receive a feed-in-tariff of RMB0.90 to RMB1.00 per kWh, whereas distribution-grid-connected projects will receive a premium of RMB0.42 per kWh in addition to the desulphurized coal benchmark price. Distribution-grid-connected projects are expected to represent the majority of China’s new PV installation in the next few years. Unlike the rest of the world, capital expenditures for distribution-grid-connected projects are higher than transmission-grid-connected projects, since labor costs for scaffolding and work on rooftops are low in China and rooftop space is currently free.

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Our Solar Projects

Beginning in 2011, we began to develop solar projects. As of December 31, 2013, our share of completed solar projects amounted to 213 MW, with annual power generation capacity approaching 324 million kWh. We are able to operate and maintain our solar projects at minimal costs. Unlike other power generation facilities, solar projects are less susceptible to risks associated with fuel prices.

Our solar projects generally begin with the signing of a non-binding investment agreement with the local government, which outlines the size and location of the project. While an investment agreement is not required for the construction of solar projects, we generally receive preferential treatment from the local governments as a result of signing such agreements. After signing the investment agreement, we will solicit the preliminary approval of the provincial NDRC. After receiving the preliminary approval, we will apply for the interconnection plan with the provincial grid company and prepare and submit applications to a number of local government authorities for approvals, such as environmental and land approvals. At the same time, we will conduct an operational and financial feasibility study. After receiving the local governmental permissions, we will apply for the construction permit, the final approval by the provincial NDRC, and, upon receipt, begin construction. Construction typically requires three to four months. After construction, we apply for the Electric Power Business Certificate with State Electricity Regulatory Commission. Finally, we sign the electricity sale agreement and interconnection agreement with the provincial grid company. It generally takes approximately seven to eight months from the signing of the investment agreement to obtaining the construction permit.

As of December 31, 2013, our share of completed solar projects amounted to 213 MW. All of our connected projects qualify for feed-in-tariffs of RMB1.00 to RMB1.05 per kWh for 20 years. We have another approximately 1,100 MW of projects currently under evaluation in our project pipeline. Our projects under evaluation include approximately 700 MW of utility scale projects and 400 MW of rooftop projects, as well as 300 to 400 MW of projects in various stages of permitting and expected to connect to grid in 2014.

The following map shows the status of the projects we completed in 2013.

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

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The following table shows the details of the projects we completed in 2013.

                 
Region   Project   Capacity (MW)   Connected Date   Approximate Cost (RMB per watt)   FIT
(RMB)
  JinkoSolar’s Ownership   Share of Capacity (MW)   Debt Financing Raised
(RMB million)
  Current Status
Qinghai     Delingha Ruiqida       30       Jan. 2013       11.44       1.05       88.7 %      27       200       Completed  
Gansu     Gansu Longchang PV       20       Feb. 2013       8.43       1       100 %      20             Completed  
Gansu     Gansu Jintai Electric I       100       July 2013       8.17       1       28 %      28             Completed  
Qinghai     Hainanzhou PV       10       Sept. 2013       8.06       1       100 %      10       80       Completed  
Xinjiang     Shaya Jingxin       20       Sept. 2013       8.38       1       100 %      20       160       Completed  
Xinjiang     Wusu Zhongjing PV       20       Dec. 2013       8.72       1       100 %      20       160       Completed  
Xinjiang     Alaer JinkoSolar       20       Dec. 2013       8.53       1       100 %      20             Completed  
Gansu     Gansu Jintai Electric II       100       Dec. 2013       8.17       1       28 %      28             Completed  
Xinjiang     Bohu Jingjia Sunshine       20       Dec. 2013       8.86       1       99.9 %      20       160       Completed  
Xinjiang     Shaya Jingxin II       20       Dec. 2013       7.02       1       100 %      20             Completed  
Total              360                                           213       760           

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Segment Information

We began developing solar projects in 2011. During the third quarter of 2013, we changed our operational focus to include both product manufacturing and solar project development. As a result of these changes, our chief operating decision maker changed the information regularly reviewed for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. Therefore, in accordance with ASC 280, Segment Reporting, in the third quarter of 2013, we began reporting our financial performance based on our two new segments: the manufacturing segment and the solar projects segment.

Revenue from the manufacturing segment consists primarily of sales of solar power products. Costs of revenue for the manufacturing segment consist primarily of costs associated with manufacturing solar products. Revenue from the solar projects segment consists primarily of feed-in-tariffs, including electricity sold on the spot market plus government subsidies. Costs of revenue for the solar projects segment consist primarily of depreciation of project assets and costs associated with operating a solar project.

The following tables set forth the results of operations of our segments and the reconciliation with our consolidated results of operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2013 and as of December 31, 2012 and September 30, 2013.

               
  For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
     2012   2013
     Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(1)   Total   Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(1)   Total
     (RMB in thousands)
Revenues     3,637,771.0             (10,169.0 )      3,627,602.0       5,083,894.4       46,899.0       (240,020.7 )      4,890,772.7  
Gross profit     189,590.6             (1,348.6 )      188,242.0       933,042.8       27,050.4       (63,580.8 )      896,512.4  
Interest expense, net     (165,399.3 )                  (165,399.3 )      (162,547.8 )      (7,465.4 )            (170,013.2 ) 
Loss/(income) before income taxes     (788,920.7 )            (1,348.6 )      (790,269.3 )      138,648.7       13,252.8       (87,435.9 )      64,465.6  

               
  As of
     December 31, 2012   September 30, 2013
     Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(2)   Total   Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(2)   Total
     (RMB in thousands)
Total assets     7,719,329.1       798,992.9       (146,001.7 )      8,372,320.3       9,094,808.1       1,952,132.5       (642,223.6 )      10,404,717.0  

(1) Elimination refers to the elimination of revenue and profit from the sale of solar modules from the manufacturing segment to the solar project segment.

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(2) Elimination refers to the elimination of unsettled receivables of the manufacturing segment and unsettled payables of the solar projects segment resulting from the above sales of solar modules.

In conjunction with this offering and the concurrent offering of our convertible notes, we assessed the impact of the aforementioned segment change on our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2011 and 2012 and each of the three years ended December 31, 2012, which were previously included in our annual report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC on April 30, 2013, as amended on May 23, 2013, or the 2012 Annual Report, which is incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus and the offering memorandum in connection with our concurrent convertible senior notes offering. We do not consider such segment change material to our financial statements taken as a whole for the periods presented, and therefore we did not retrospectively recast the annual financial statements included in the 2012 Annual Report in conjunction with this offering or the concurrent offering of our convertible notes.

The following tables set forth our updated segment information as of and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2012.

               
  For the Year Ended December 31,
     2011   2012
     Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(1)   Total   Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(1)   Total
     (RMB in thousands)
Revenues     7,544,252.0             (159,300.6 )      7,384,951.4       4,909,005.4       1,607.1       (115,844.1 )      4,794,768.4  
Gross profit     1,162,940.4             (13,089.2 )      1,149,851.2       237,322.3       (3,986.8 )      (1,098.4 )      232,237.1  
Interest expense, net     (182,502.2 )                  (182,502.2 )      (221,719.8 )                  (221,719.8 ) 
Loss/(income) before income taxes     367,637.7       (149.9 )      (13,089.2 )      354,398.6       (1,526,557.9 )      (25,061.0 )      (1,098.5 )      (1,552,717.4 ) 

               
  As of December 31,
     2011   2012
     Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(2)   Total   Manufacturing   Solar projects   Elimination(2)   Total
     (RMB in thousands)
Total assets     8,921,130.3       288,358.3       (33,089.3 )      9,176,399.3       7,719,329.1       798,992.9       (146,001.7 )      8,372,320.3  

(1) Elimination refers to the elimination of revenue and profit from the sale of solar modules from the manufacturing segment to solar project segment.
(2) Elimination refers to the elimination of unsettled receivables of the manufacturing segment and unsettled payables of the solar projects segment resulting from the above sales of solar modules.

We did not have any solar projects business prior to 2011. Therefore, the financial information for the period prior to and including the year ended December 31, 2010, as reported in the 2012 Annual Report, is solely in connection with our manufacturing business.

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Results of Operations

The following table sets forth a summary of our unaudited consolidated results of operations for the periods indicated.

         
  For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
     2012
(RMB)
  2012
(% of revenue)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
  2013
(% of
revenue)
     (in thousands, except percentage)
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:
                                            
Revenue     3,627,602.0       100.0       4,890,772.7       799,145.9       100.0  
Sales of solar modules     3,006,372.1       82.9       4,611,999.4       753,594.7       94.3  
Sales of silicon wafers     296,658.2       8.2       62,559.0       10,222.1       1.3  
Sales of solar cells     98,044.7       2.7       102,294.3       16,714.8       2.1  
Sales of silicon ingots     1,885.6       0.1       1,175.0       192.0       0.0  
Sales of recovered silicon materials     270.4       0.0       4,550.6       743.6       0.1  
Processing service fees     142,824.1       3.9       45,803.7       7,484.3       0.9  
Solar system integration projects     79,796.4       2.2       201.1       32.9       0.0  
Revenue from generated electricity                 46,899.0       7,663.2       1.0  
Others     1,750.5       0.0       15,290.6       2,498.3       0.3  
Cost of revenues     (3,439,360.0 )      94.8       (3,994,260.3 )      (652,656.9 )      81.7  
Gross profit     188,242.0       5.2       896,512.4       146,489.0       18.3  
Total operating expenses     (688,019.9 )      19.0       (513,272.2 )      (83,868.0 )      10.5  
Income/(loss) from operations     (499,777.9 )      13.8       383,240.2       62,621.0       7.8  
Interest expenses, net     (165,399.3 )      4.6       (170,013.2 )      (27,779.9 )      3.5  
Subsidy income     284.0       0.0       4,059.7       663.3       0.1  
Exchange loss     (46,176.4 )      1.3       (31,968.2 )      (5,223.6 )      0.7  
Other (expense)/income, net     8,333.2       0.2       7,366.3       1,203.6       0.2  
Change in fair value of forward
contracts
    (59,043.3 )      1.6       32,643.3       5,333.9       0.7  
Change in fair value of convertible senior notes and capped call options     (28,489.6 )      0.8       (160,862.5 )      (26,284.7 )      3.3  
Income/(loss) before income taxes     (790,269.3 )      21.8       64,465.6       10,533.6       1.3  
Income tax (expense)/benefit     9,000.8       0.2       (18,185.2 )      (2,971.4 )      0.4  
Equity in gain/(loss) of affiliated companies                 (21,731.1 )      (3,550.8 )      0.4  
Net income/(loss)     (781,268.5 )      21.5       24,549.3       4,011.4       0.5  
Less: Net income attributable to the
non-controlling interests
    16.9       0.0       823.5       134.6       0.0  
Net income/(loss) attributable to JinkoSolar Holding Co., Ltd.     (781,285.4 )      21.5       23,725.8       3,876.8       0.5  

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Unaudited Quarterly Results of Operations

The following table sets forth selected unaudited quarterly results of operations for each quarter during the period from March 31, 2012 to September 30, 2013. We derived this information from our unaudited consolidated financial statements, which we prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements contained in the 2012 Annual Report. In our opinion, these unaudited statements include all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments that we consider necessary for a fair statement of that information when read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in the 2012 Annual Report. The operating results for any quarter should not be considered indicative of results for any future period.

             
  For the Three Months Ended
     March 31, 2012   June 30,
2012
  September 30, 2012   December 31, 2012   March 31, 2013   June 30,
2013
  September 30, 2013
     (RMB in thousands, except as otherwise indicated)
Revenue     1,060,081.5       1,237,991.4       1,329,529.1       1,167,166.5       1,163,403.7       1,764,884.9       1,962,484.1  
Cost of revenues     (1,053,049.4 )      (1,134,400.8 )      (1,251,909.8 )      (1,123,171.4 )      (1,016,091.6 )      (1,453,298.1 )      (1,524,870.6 ) 
Gross profit     7,032.1       103,590.6       77,619.3       43,995.1       147,312.1       311,586.8       437,613.5  
(Loss)/income before income taxes     (356,253.7 )      (320,777.7 )      (113,237.9 )      (762,448.1 )      (129,103.5 )      67,335.9       126,233.2  
Income tax
benefit/(expense)
          10,290.2       (1,289.4 )      (83.1 )      (13.2 )      215.6       (18,387.6 ) 
Net (loss)/income     (356,253.7 )      (310,487.5 )      (114,527.3 )      (762,546.4 )      (129,161.7 )      48,270.8       105,440.2  
Net (loss)/income attributable to JinkoSolar
Holding Co., Ltd.
    (356,270.5 )      (310,485.8 )      (114,529.1 )      (761,135.4 )      (128,744.1 )      48,962.5       103,507.4  
Module
shipments (MW)
    157.1       223.0       280.0       252.3       282.4       460.0       489.3  
Module average selling
price (US$)
    0.83       0.74       0.64       0.56       0.59       0.60       0.63  
Module silicon costs (US$ per watt)     0.16       0.14       0.12       0.09       0.09       0.09       0.09  
Module non-silicon costs
(US$ per watt)
    0.58       0.52       0.47       0.45       0.42       0.41       0.41  
PV multicrystalline cell average conversion efficiency     16.9 %      17.2 %      17.5 %      17.6 %      17.6 %      17.8 %      17.9 % 

The following table describes depreciation and amortization expenses included in our cost of sales and operating expenses for the periods indicated.

             
  For the Three Months Ended
     March 31, 2012   June 30,
2012
  September 30, 2012   December 31, 2012   March 31, 2013   June 30,
2013
  September 30, 2013
     (RMB in thousands, except as otherwise indicated)
Depreciation of plant, property and equipment     78,633.8       80,062.2       82,249.8       82,206.8       83,639.0       77,032.7       86,385.4  
Depreciation of project assets     1,147.2       1,235.7       1,397.5       1,361.1       5,016.7       6,441.3       6,468.7  
Amortization of land use rights and intangible assets     1,857.1       1,686.4       1,895.4       1,871.5       1,722.8       2,048.1       1,903.3  

We shipped solar modules in the range of 500 MW to 530 MW in the fourth quarter of 2013 and in the range 1.7 GW to 1.8 GW for the full year ended December 31, 2013. We operated 213 MW of projects as an independent power producer as of December 31, 2013. Our PV multicrystalline cell average conversion efficiency reached 17.9% in the fourth quarter of 2013.

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2013 Compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2012

Total revenue of RMB3,637.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 was derived entirely from the manufacturing segment. Total revenue of RMB5,130.8 million (US$838.4 million) for the same period in 2013 consisted of RMB5,083.9 million (US$830.7 million) from the manufacturing segment and RMB46.9 million (US$7.7 million) from the solar projects segment.

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The increase in total revenue from the manufacturing segment was primarily due to an increase in shipments of solar modules from 660 MW for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to 1,232 MW for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, primarily due to a significant increase in shipments to China and other Asia-Pacific countries, which was mainly driven by the increased sales and marketing activities in such regions, partially offset by a decrease in shipments to Europe, which was mainly driven by reduced demand as government support for solar projects in Europe decreased in response to the European debt crisis. Revenue from the increase in shipments was partially offset by a decrease in average selling prices of solar modules, primarily due to an increase in the relative oversupply of solar modules and decrease in the price of polysilicon, the principal raw material for PV modules, from the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to the same period in 2013. Cost of revenues for the manufacturing segment increased 20.4% from RMB3,448.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to RMB4,150.9 million (US$678.2 million) for the same period in 2013, primarily as a result of the increase in shipments of solar modules, partially offset by a decrease in the average unit cost for our solar modules. Gross profit for the manufacturing segment for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was RMB933.0 million (US$152.5 million), compared to RMB189.6 million for the same period in 2012.

In the nine months ended September 30, 2013, total revenue from the solar project segment was RMB46.9 million (US$7.7 million), all of which was from feed-in-tariffs. In the third quarter of 2013, we began recording as revenue government subsidies for electricity revenues from solar projects since July 1, 2013. Of the revenue from generated electricity in the third quarter of 2013, RMB16.7 million (US$2.7 million) was related to the government subsidy for electricity revenues for the six months ended June 30, 2013, RMB2.1 million (US$0.3 million) was related to the government subsidy for electricity revenues for the full year ended December 31, 2012 and RMB14.7 million (US$2.4 million) was related to the government subsidy for electricity revenues in the third quarter of 2013. Excluding the government subsidy for electricity revenues before July 1, 2013 which were recognized during the third quarter of 2013, electricity revenues and gross profit for electricity from solar projects for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 were RMB28.1 million (US$4.6 million) and RMB8.2 million (US$1.3 million), respectively. Cost of revenues for the solar projects segment for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 were RMB19.8 million (US$3.2 million) primarily as a result of increased depreciation of property, plant and equipment. Gross profit for the solar projects segment for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was RMB27.1 million (US$4.4 million). We did not generate revenue from the solar project segment in the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

Gross margin increased from 5.2% for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to 18.3% for the same period in 2013, primarily due to our improvements in operating efficiency and continued cost reductions for polysilicon and auxiliary materials, partially offset by lower average selling prices of solar modules.

Total operating expenses decreased from RMB688.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to RMB513.3 million (US$83.9 million) for the same period in 2013, primarily due to (i) a provision of RMB129.8 million in the first quarter of 2012 on inventory purchase prepayments under long-term polysilicon supply contracts as a result of adverse developments in a supplier’s operations and (ii) the reversal of provision for bad debts of RMB119.0 million (US$19.4 million) for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 as a result of the subsequent cash collection of long-aged accounts receivable, partially offset by an increase in shipping and warranty costs resulting from the increase in solar module shipments.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

We have financed our operations primarily through equity contributions from our shareholders, the net proceeds of our securities offerings, cash flow generated from operations, as well as issuance of bonds, short-term and long-term debt financing.

As of September 30, 2013, we had RMB950.0 million (US$155.2 million) in cash and cash equivalents and RMB388.4 million (US$63.5 million) in restricted cash. Our cash and cash equivalents represent cash on hand and demand deposits with original maturities of three months or less that are placed with banks and other financial institutions. Our restricted cash represents deposits legally held by banks which are not available for general use. These deposits are held as collateral for issuance of letters of credit and bank acceptable notes to vendors for purchase of machinery and equipment and raw materials.

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As of September 30, 2013, we had entered into purchase agreements for purchasing additional manufacturing equipment. Our purchase capital commitments under these contracts amounted to approximately RMB392.8 million (US$64.2 million) as of September 30, 2013, of which RMB373.9 million (US$61.1 million) will be due within one year after September 30, 2013. We plan to use the remaining available cash for research and development and for working capital and other day-to-day operating purposes.

As of September 30, 2013, we had total bank credit facilities available of RMB4.80 billion (US$784.8 million) with various banks, of which RMB2.86 billion (US$468.0 million) were drawn down and RMB1.94billion (US$316.8 million) were available.

As of September 30, 2013, we had short-term borrowings (including the portion of long-term borrowings due within one year) of RMB2,020.9 million (US$330.2 million). As of September 30, 2013, we had short-term borrowings outstanding of RMB1,839.2 million (US$300.5 million) and RMB181.7 million (US$29.7 million), which were denominated in RMB and U.S. dollars, respectively, and bearing a weighted average interest rates of 6.3% and 2.5% per annum, respectively.

As of September 30, 2013, we pledged equipment of a total net book value of RMB2,084.0 million (US$340.5 million) and inventories of a total net book value of RMB212.7 million (US$34.8 million) and land use rights of a total net book value of RMB204.3 million (US$33.4 million) and property and plants of a total net book value of RMB375.1 million (US$61.3 million) to secure repayment of our short-term borrowings of RMB1,432.2 million (US$234.0 million). As of September 30, 2013, our outstanding short-term borrowings guaranteed by our founders were RMB542.0 million (US$88.6 million). Although we have increased our level of short-term bank borrowings to meet our working capital, capital expenditures and other needs, we have not experienced any difficulties in repaying our borrowings.

We have long-term borrowings (excluding the portion of long-term borrowings due within one year) of RMB383.0 million (US$62.6 million) as of September 30, 2013. Long-term borrowings outstanding as of September 30, 2013 bore interest at an average annual rate of 7.2%. In connection with most of our long-term borrowings, we have granted security interests over significant amounts of our assets. As of September 30, 2013, we pledged land use rights with net book value of RMB78.7 million (US$12.9 million) and project assets of a total net book value of RMB325.2 to secure repayment of borrowings of RMB383.0 million (US$62.6 million). As of September 30, 2013, long-term loans (including the portion of long-term borrowings due within one year) in the amount of RMB278.0 million (US$45.4 million) will be due for repayment upon maturity within one year after September 30, 2013 and long-term loans in the amount of RMB31.0 million (US$5.1 million) will be due for repayment upon maturity in September 30, 2015.

In addition, we have substantial repayment obligations under our convertible notes. On May 17, 2011, we issued convertible senior notes in the principal amount of US$125 million due 2016, bearing an annual interest rate of 4.00%, with an option for holders to require us to repurchase their notes in May 2014 for the principal of the notes plus accrued and unpaid interest. Concurrent with our issuance of the convertible senior notes, we entered into a capped call option transaction with an affiliate of the initial purchaser of the notes. We paid a total premium for the capped call option of US$18.0 million. As of September 30, 2013, we had US$123.0 million of the convertible notes due 2016 outstanding.

On April 23, 2012, Jinko Solar Co., Ltd., our wholly-owned operating subsidiary incorporated in the PRC, issued unsecured one-year short-term bonds with a principal amount of RMB300 million. The bonds bear a fixed annual interest rate of 6.3% and will mature on April 23, 2013. On January 29, 2013, Jinko Solar Co., Ltd. issued six-year bonds with a principal amount of RMB800 million, bearing a fixed annual interest rate of 8.99%. At the end of the third year in the life of the bonds, Jinko Solar Co., Ltd. has the option to raise the interest rate by up to 100 basis points, and the bondholders will have the right to require Jinko Solar Co., Ltd. to repurchase all or part of their bonds upon Jinko Solar Co., Ltd.’s announcement of whether or not we decide to raise the interest rate, and by how much, at such time. On March 19, 2013, we entered into loan facilities for an aggregate principal amount of RMB360 million (approximately US$58.8 million) and a term of 15 years with China Development Bank.

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On September 25, 2013, we completed a follow-on public offering of 4,370,000 ADSs, receiving aggregate net proceeds of approximately US$67.3 million, after deducting discounts and commissions and offering expenses.

We had negative working capital as of September 30, 2013. Our management believes that our current cash position as of September 30, 2013, the cash expected to be generated from operations and funds available from borrowings under the bank quotas will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next twelve months from September 30, 2013. However, in light of the amount of bank borrowings and bonds are due in the near term future and exercise of the put option of the convertible senior notes on May 14, 2014, sufficient funds may not be available. Accordingly, we may need to reduce discretionary spending and raise additional funds through public or private equity or debt financing. Any additional equity financing may be dilutive to our shareholders and debt financing, if available, may involve covenants that would restrict us. Additional funds may not be available on terms commercially acceptable to us or at all. Failure to manage discretionary spending and raise additional capital or debt financing as required may adversely impact our ability to achieve our intended business objectives.

Cash Flows and Working Capital

The following table sets forth a summary of our cash flows for the periods indicated:

     
  For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
     2012
(RMB)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
     (in thousands)
Net cash provided by operating activities     723,773.5       514,631.7       84,090.1  
Net cash used in investing activities     (380,829.0 )      (1,203,322.3 )      (196,621.3 ) 
Net cash (used in)/provided by financing activities     (549,054.7 )      1,364,577.4       222,970.2  
Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents     708.6       (5,014.4 )      (819.3 ) 
Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalent     (205,401.6 )      670,872.4       109,619.7  
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year     433,851.0       279,130.0       45,609.5  
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year     228,449.4       950,002.4       155,229.2  

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was RMB514.6 million (US$84.1 million), consisting primarily of (i) a decrease in accounts receivable of RMB356.5 million (US$58.3 million); (ii) an increase in other payables and accruals of RMB117.6 million (US$19.2 million), primarily due to an increase in subsidy payments for several power plants; an increase in the payment of interest on bonds and increase in accrued warranty cost; (iii) a change in fair value of convertible senior notes of RMB201.8 million (US$33.0 million) and (iv) an increase in advances from customers of RMB193.2 million (US$31.6 million), primarily due to improved credit terms with our customers and decreased accounts receivable turnover, partially offset by (i) an increase in notes receivable of RMB196.3 million (US$32.1 million), primarily due to the receipt of one customer’s RMB141.0 million (US$23.0 million) corporate acceptance notes; (ii) an increase in prepayments and other current assets of RMB141.8 million (US$23.2 million), primarily due to an increase in the balance of VAT recoverable of RMB137.7 million (US$22.5 million), as more raw material purchased and (iii) the reversal of provision for allowance of doubtful accounts of RMB119.0 million (US$19.4 million), primarily due to settlement of long-aged accounts receivable which were previously provided for.

Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was RMB1,203.3 million (US$196.6 million), consisting primarily of (i) cash paid for short-term investments of RMB1,368.2 million (US$223.6 million); (ii) the purchase of property, plant and equipment of RMB387.6 million (US$63.3 million) and (iii) cash paid for project assets of RMB373.6 million (US$61.1 million), partially offset by cash collected for short-term investments of RMB1,244.3 million (US$203.3 million).

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Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was RMB1,364.6 million (US$223.0 million), consisting primarily of (i) borrowings from third parties of RMB2,451.7 million (US$400.6 million); (ii) proceeds from Jinko Solar Co., Ltd.’s January 2013 bond issuance of RMB800.0 million (US$130.7 million); (iii) proceeds from the September 2013 follow-on offering of RMB414.7 million (US$67.8 million) and (iv) an increase in notes payable of RMB406.8 million (US$66.5 million), primarily due to draw down in the credit quotes provided by major banks for issuing acceptance note, partially offset by (i) repayment of borrowings to third parties of RMB2,455.9 million (US$401.3 million) and (ii) repayment of bonds payable of RMB300.0 million (US$49.0 million) for our short-term bonds.

Contractual Obligations

The following table sets forth our contractual obligations as of September 30, 2013.

         
  Payment due by period
Contractual Obligations   Total   less than
1 year
  1 – 3
years
  3 – 5
years
  more than
5 years
     (RMB in thousands)
Short-term Debt Obligations*     2,058,828.8       2,058,828.8                    
Long-term Debt Obligations*     659,292.0       27,697.7       86,318.2       60,417.6       484,858.5  
Bonds Payable and Accrued Interests     968,812.2       71,920.0       896,892.2              
Convertible Senior Notes*     771,746.3       771,746.3                    
Operating Lease Obligations     17,611.0       8,893.2       5,256.1       2,478.8       982.9  
Capital Commitment     392,835.9       373,942.4       18,893.5              
Total     4,869,126.2       3,313,028.4       1,007,360.0       62,896.4       485,841.4  

* Include accrued interest

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THE OFFERING

Price per ADS    
    US$
Total ADSs we are offering    
    2,750,000 ADSs.
ADSs outstanding immediately after this offering    
    19,144,493 ADSs (19,556,993 ADSs if the underwriter exercises its option to purchase additional ADSs in full).
Ordinary shares outstanding immediately after this offering    
    119,051,630 shares (120,701,630 shares if the underwriter exercises its option to purchase additional ADSs in full).
    The number of ordinary shares outstanding immediately after the offering:
   

•  

excludes 7,070,802 ordinary shares issuable as of the date of this prospectus supplement upon the exercise of outstanding options granted under our 2009 Long Term Incentive Plan;

   

•  

excludes a further 3,192,620 ordinary shares reserved for issuance under our 2009 Long Term Incentive Plan; and

   

•  

excludes ordinary shares issuable upon the conversion of our US$123.0 million of outstanding convertible senior notes issued on in May 2011, which may be converted into 14,577,776 ordinary shares, and the convertible notes offered concurrently with this offering.

The ADSs    
    Each ADS represents four ordinary shares, par value US$0.00002 per ordinary share.
    The depositary will be the holder of the ordinary shares underlying the ADSs and, as an ADS holder, you will not be treated as one of our shareholders in respect of those ADSs. You will have the rights provided in the deposit agreement among us, the depositary and the owners and beneficial owners of ADSs from time to time. Under the deposit agreement, you may instruct the depositary to vote the ordinary shares underlying your ADSs. You must pay a fee for each issuance or cancellation of an ADS, distribution of securities by the depositary or any other depositary service.
    For more information about our ADSs, you should carefully read the section in the accompanying prospectus entitled “Description of American Depositary Shares.” We also encourage you to read the deposit agreement, which is an exhibit to the registration statement that includes this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus.
Option to purchase additional
ADSs
   
    We have granted the underwriter an option, exercisable within 30 days from the date of this prospectus supplement, to purchase up to an aggregate of 412,500 additional ADSs.
Use of proceeds    
    We estimate that the net proceeds from this offering will be approximately US$     million (or US$     million if the underwriter exercises its option to purchase additional notes in

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    full), after deducting underwriting commissions and fees and estimated offering expenses.
    We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering and the concurrent offering of convertible notes for general corporate purposes, which may include expanding manufacturing capacity, the development of solar power projects and working capital. Our management will retain broad discretion over the use of proceeds, and we may ultimately use the proceeds for different purposes than what we currently intend. Pending any ultimate use of any portion of the proceeds from this offering, we intend to invest the net proceeds in short-term, marketable instruments.
Risk factors    
    See “Risk Factors” and other information included in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, as such factors may be amended, updated or modified periodically in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in the ADSs.
Description of concurrent offering    
    Concurrently with this offering, US$100.0 million aggregate principal amount of convertible notes are being offered pursuant to a separate offering memorandum (or up to US$115.0 million aggregate principal amount if the underwriter in the convertible notes offering exercises its over-allotment option in full) to “qualified institutional buyers” (as defined in Rule 144A under the Securities Act) and outside of the United States to non-U.S. persons in reliance on Regulation S. The closing of the offering of the shares pursuant to this prospectus is contingent upon the closing of the convertible notes offering, and the closing of the concurrent offering of our convertible notes is contingent upon the closing of the offering of the shares hereunder.
NYSE symbol for our ADSs    
    Our ADSs are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “JKS.”
Depositary    
    JPMorgan Chase Bank
Lock-up    
    We have agreed for a period until 90 days after the date of this prospectus supplement not to sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of any of our ordinary shares, all of our existing ADSs or similar securities, subject to certain exceptions. Furthermore, our directors and executive officers and certain of our shareholders have agreed to a similar 90-day lock-up, subject to certain exceptions. This lock-up will not apply to the exercise of share options granted as of the date of this prospectus supplement. See “Underwriting.”
Payment and settlement    
    The ADSs are expected to be delivered through the book-entry transfer facilities of the Depository Trust Company, or DTC, in New York, New York on or about            , 2014.

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SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL AND OPERATING DATA

The following summary consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 and the summary consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2011 and 2012 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included in our 2012 Annual Report. The summary consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2010 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included in our annual report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC on April 18, 2012, as amended on April 19, 2012.

The following summary consolidated statement of operations data for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2013 and the summary consolidated balance sheet data as of September 30, 2013 have been derived from our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. Our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a consistent basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and include all normal and recurring adjustments that we consider necessary for a fair statement of our financial position and operating results for the applicable dates and periods presented.

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The summary consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with those financial statements and the accompanying notes and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” included in our 2012 Annual Report incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement. Our consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or U.S. GAAP. The historical results are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected in any future period.

           
  For the Year Ended December 31,   For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
     2010
(RMB)
  2011
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
     (in thousands, except share and per share data)
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:
                                                     
Revenues     4,654,854.7       7,384,951.4       4,794,768.4       3,627,602.0       4,890,772.7       799,145.9  
Cost of revenues     (3,297,468.9 )      (6,235,100.2 )      (4,562,531.3 )      (3,439,360.0 )      (3,994,260.3 )      (652,656.9 ) 
Gross profit     1,357,385.8       1,149,851.2       232,237.1       188,242.0       896,512.4       146,489.0  
Total operating expenses     (367,463.5 )      (833,965.5 )      (1,465,724.3 )      (688,019.9 )      (513,272.2 )      (83,868.0 ) 
Income/(loss) from
operations
    989,922.3       315,885.7       (1,233,487.2 )      (499,777.9 )      383,240.2       62,621.0  
Interest expenses, net     (64,268.4 )      (182,502.2 )      (221,719.8 )      (165,399.3 )      (170,013.2 )      (27,779.9 ) 
Convertible senior notes issuance costs           (30,154.1 )                         
Subsidy income     15,696.6       25,553.8       40,902.6       284.0       4,059.7       663.3  
Investment gain     60.1                                
Exchange loss     (10,143.4 )      (138,994.3 )      (36,472.7 )      (46,176.4 )      (31,968.2 )      (5,223.6 ) 
Other (expense)/income,
net
    (1,357.9 )      28,257.1       4,263.5       8,333.2       7,366.3       1,203.6  
Change in fair value of forward contracts     98,039.3       36,604.9       (9,043.1 )      (59,043.3 )      32,643.3       5,333.9  
Change in fair value of embedded derivatives     55.0                                
Change in fair value of convertible senior notes and capped call options           299,747.7       (97,160.7 )      (28,489.6 )      (160,862.5 )      (26,284.7 ) 
Income/(loss) before income taxes     1,028,003.6       354,398.6       (1,552,717.4 )      (790,269.3 )      64,465.6       10,533.6  
Income tax
(expense)/benefit
    (146,130.4 )      (81,072.7 )      8,917.6       9,000.8       (18,185.2 )      (2,971.4 ) 
Equity in gain/(loss) of affiliated companies                 (16.3 )            (21,731.1 )      (3,550.8 ) 
Net income/(loss)     881,873.2       273,325.9       (1,543,816.1 )      (781,268.5 )      24,549.3       4,011.4  
less: Net income attributable to the non-controlling interests           16.9       1,394.0       16.9       823.5       134.6  
Net income/(loss) attributable to JinkoSolar
Holding Co., Ltd.
    881,873.2       273,342.8       (1,542,422.1 )      (781,285.4 )      23,725.8       3,876.8  
Net income/(loss) attributable to JinkoSolar
Holding Co., Ltd’s ordinary shareholders per share
                                                     
Basic     11.16       2.91       (17.38 )      (8.80 )      0.27       0.04  
Diluted     10.92       (1.23 )      (17.38 )      (8.80 )      0.26       0.04  
Net income (loss) attributable to JinkoSolar
Holding Co., Ltd’s ordinary shareholders per ADS(1)
                                                     
Basic     44.64       11.64       (69.52 )      (35.20 )      1.08       0.16  
Diluted     43.69       (4.92 )      (69.52 )      (35.20 )      1.04       0.16  

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  For the Year Ended December 31,   For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
     2010
(RMB)
  2011
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
     (in thousands, except share and per share data)
Weighted average ordinary shares outstanding
                                                     
Basic     74,896,543       93,966,535       88,752,706       88,748,445       89,317,742       89,317,742  
Diluted     80,748,080       102,686,971       88,752,706       88,748,445       91,097,669       91,097,669  

(1) Each ADS represents four ordinary shares.

         
  As of December 31,   As of September 30,
     2010
(RMB)
  2011
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
     (in thousands)
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:
                                            
Cash and cash equivalents     521,204.8       433,851.0       279,130.0       950,002.5       155,229.2  
Restricted cash     416,789.7       146,175.5       140,760.8       388,424.5       63,468.1  
Short-term investments     34,705.8       494,215.0       722,461.3       846,302.7       138,284.8  
Account receivable, net – related parties     100.4       31,010.2       105,531.4       284,336.2       46,460.2  
Accounts receivable, net – third parties     576,796.4       1,600,206.9       1,712,685.2       1,409,422.7       230,297.8  
Advances to suppliers, net – third parties     339,738.1       208,104.1       63,553.0       92,774.2       15,159.2  
Inventories     819,514.5       798,075.3       527,962.4       629,624.0       102,879.7  
Total current assets     3,194,474.1       4,608,473.7       3,985,609.2       5,474,862.3       894,585.3  
Project assets           272,504.7       536,391.1       962,521.2       157,274.7  
Property, plant and equipment,
net
    1,938,978.2       3,568,294.3       3,329,872.7       3,331,930.0       544,433.0  
Land use rights, net     261,858.6       368,042.9       365,749.2       360,694.6       58,937.0  
Advances to suppliers to be utilized beyond one year     234,577.1       209,630.9                    
Total assets     5,880,345.8       9,176,399.3       8,372,320.3       10,404,717.0       1,700,117.2  
Accounts payable – a related
party
          35,887.8       30,045.2       28,611.3       4,675.0  
Accounts payable – third parties     355,011.7       340,998.6       1,347,327.0       1,444,785.5       236,076.1  
Notes payable     571,522.2       909,830.6       1,149,136.5       1,555,973.0       254,244.0  
Accrued payroll and welfare expenses     96,853.9       176,647.8       206,425.1       228,541.3       37,343.3  
Advance from third party
customers
    164,956.9       85,524.0       121,031.2       313,814.9       51,276.9  
Bonds payable and accrued
interests
          1,039,635.3       313,689.8       48,745.8       7,965.0  
Convertible senior notes                       673,228.1       110,004.6  
Short-term borrowings from third parties (including current portion of long-term borrowings)     1,171,776.3       2,200,032.1       2,245,630.8       2,020,911.2       330,214.2  
Total current liabilities     2,941,912.9       5,642,586.6       6,238,443.5       7,242,408.3       1,183,400.0  
Long-term borrowings     269,250.0       155,500.0       167,000.0       383,000.0       62,581.7  
Bond payables                       800,000.0       130,719.0  
Convertible senior notes              387,777.2       483,581.7              

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  As of December 31,   As of September 30,
     2010
(RMB)
  2011
(RMB)
  2012
(RMB)
  2013
(RMB)
  2013
(US$)
     (in thousands)
Total liabilities     3,215,143.9       6,271,225.8       6,998,508.9       8,567,297.8       1,399,885.3  
Total JinkoSolar Holding Co., Ltd. shareholders’ equity     2,665,201.9       2,895,190.5       1,365,122.3       1,827,106.9       298,546.9  
Non-controlling interests           9,983.1       8,689.1       10,312.2       1,685.0  
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity     5,880,345.8       9,176,399.3       8,372,320.3       10,404,717.0       1,700,117.2  

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our ADSs involves certain risks. You should carefully consider the risks described below as well as the other information included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus before making an investment decision. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially and adversely affected by any of these risks. The value of our ADSs could decline due to any of these risks, and you may lose all or part of your investment. In addition, please read “Special Note on Forward-Looking Statements” in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus where we describe additional uncertainties associated with our business and the forward-looking statements included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement. Please note that additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also impair our business and operations.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

We require a significant amount of cash to fund our operations and future business developments; if we cannot obtain additional funding on terms satisfactory to us when we need it, our growth prospects and future profitability may be materially and adversely affected.

We require a significant amount of cash to fund our operations, including the development of solar projects and payments to suppliers for our polysilicon feedstock. We may also require additional cash due to changing business conditions or other future developments, including any investments or acquisitions we may decide to pursue, as well as our research and development activities in order to remain competitive. We had negative working capital as of September 30, 2013. Management believes that our current cash position, the cash expected to be generated from operations and funds available from borrowings under our bank facilities will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, in light of the amount of bank borrowings and bonds due in the near term future, and the put option of our convertible senior notes becoming exercisable in May 2014, we may need to reduce discretionary spending and raise additional funds through public or private equity or debt financing. Our ability to obtain external financing is subject to a number of uncertainties, including:

our future financial condition, results of operations and cash flows;
the state of global credit markets;
general market conditions for financing activities by companies in our industry; and
economic, political and other conditions in China and elsewhere.

Any additional equity financing may be dilutive to our shareholders and any debt financing may require restrictive covenants. Additional funds may not be available on terms commercially acceptable to us. Failure to manage discretionary spending and raise additional capital or debt financing as required may adversely impact our ability to achieve our intended business objectives. See “— Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.”

Our future growth and profitability depend on the demand for and the prices of solar power products and the development of PV technologies.

The rate and extent of market acceptance for solar power depends on the availability of government subsidies and the cost-effectiveness, performance and reliability of solar power relative to conventional and other renewable energy sources. Changes in government policies towards solar power and advancements in PV technologies could significantly affect the demand for solar power products.

Demand for solar power products is also affected by macroeconomic factors, such as energy supply, demand and prices, as well as regulations and policies governing renewable energies and related industries. For example, demand for solar power products declined precipitously in late 2008 due to decreased financing availability for downstream buyers caused by the global economic crisis. As a result, decreased demand coupled with increased manufacturing capacity caused a decline in the prices of solar power products. The prices of solar power products further declined since 2009 primarily due to decreased prices of polysilicon as well as increased manufacturing capacity for solar power products. Over the last three years, demand in

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Europe was generally low as a result of the reductions in feed-in-tariffs in Germany and the elimination of feed-in-tariffs in Italy, the two largest European markets. In 2010, as the effect of the global economic crisis subsided, the combination of increased availability of financing for downstream buyers and decreased average selling prices of solar power products contributed to an overall increase in demand for solar power products. However, in 2011, a decrease in payment to solar power producers, in the form of feed-in tariffs and other reimbursements, and a reduction in available financing caused a decrease in the demand for solar power products, including solar modules, in the European markets. Payments to solar power producers decreased as governments in Europe, under pressure to reduce sovereign debt levels, reduced subsidies such as feed-in tariffs. Furthermore, many downstream purchasers of solar power products were unable to secure sufficient financing for the solar power projects due to the global credit crunch. It is estimated that demand for solar modules in Europe fell significantly in 2013. As a result, many solar power producers that typically purchase solar power products from manufacturers like us were unable or unwilling to expand their operations.

These market conditions were exacerbated by an oversupply of solar power products driven by increased manufacturing capacity, which adversely affected the prices of solar power products. As a result, the average selling price of our solar modules, which represented 81.3% of our total revenue in 2012, decreased from RMB8.7 per watt for 2011 to RMB4.3 per watt for 2012, and further decreased to RMB3.74 per watt for the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

We cannot assure you that the price of solar modules will not decline further in the future. Any reduction in the price of solar modules will have a negative impact on our revenue and results of operations. As a result, we may not be profitable on a quarterly or annual basis. For example, we experienced net losses in each quarter from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the first quarter of 2013. In addition, if demand for solar power projects and solar power products weakens in the future, our business and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

Solar project development may not proceed as expected and may not be successfully completed, which could increase our costs, impair our ability to recover our investments and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The development and construction of solar projects involve numerous risks and uncertainties. We may be required to spend significant amounts of money for land and interconnection rights, preliminary engineering, permitting, legal and other expenses before we can determine whether a project is economically, technologically or otherwise feasible. Success in developing a particular project is contingent upon, among other things:

negotiation of satisfactory engineering, procurement and construction agreements;
securing a project site, necessary rights of way and satisfactory land rights;
receipt from governmental authorities of required land use and construction permits and approvals;
receipt of rights to interconnect the project to the electric grid or to transmit energy;
payment of interconnection and other deposits, some of which are non-refundable;
financeable arrangements for the purchase of the solar power and renewable energy attributes generated by the project;
construction financing, including debt, equity and funds from tax credits and other tax benefits; and
timely implementation and satisfactory completion of construction.
Successful completion of a particular project may be adversely affected by numerous factors, including without limitation:
delays in obtaining and maintaining required governmental permits, licenses and approvals;
inability to procure adequate financing, especially for engineering, procurement and construction;
potential challenges from project stakeholders, such as local residents, environmental organizations and others who may not support the project;

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unforeseen engineering problems;
construction delays and contractor performance shortfalls;
work stoppages;
cost over-runs;
labor, equipment and materials supply shortages or disruptions;
unfavorable tax treatment;
adverse weather conditions;
adverse environmental and geological conditions; and
force majeure and other events beyond our control.

Accordingly, some of the solar projects in our pipeline may not be completed or even proceed to construction. If a number of projects are not completed, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

The delay between making significant upfront investments in our projects and receiving revenue could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

There are generally many months or even years between our initial significant upfront investments in solar projects and when those projects begin to generate revenue. These upfront investments include payments for land rights, large transmission and power purchase agreement deposits or other payments, all of which may be non-refundable. In addition, there have historically been significant delays in the payment of China’s renewable energy subsidies, even after electricity has been sold to grid. Furthermore, we rely on long-term financing, such as equity financing or debt financing with long investment horizons, such as our financing from China Development Bank, to reduce risks associated with our solar projects. The delay between generating revenue and making upfront investments could adversely affect our business and results of operations. Furthermore, our ability to simultaneously fund our operations may be constrained by our inability to recognize revenue.

We are subject to risks associated with construction, cost overruns, delays and other contingencies.

Construction of our solar projects may be adversely affected by circumstances outside of our control, including inclement weather, acts of God, delays in regulatory approvals, or third-party delays in providing inverters or other materials. Shortages of skilled labor could also significantly delay a project or otherwise increase our costs. Changes in project plans or defective or late execution may increase our costs and reduce our margins.

To expand our solar project development business, we must find and obtain land use rights for suitable solar project sites.

Solar projects require solar conditions that can only be found in a limited number of geographic areas and project sites. Further, large utility-scale solar projects must be interconnected to electricity transmission grids in order to deliver electricity. Once we have identified a suitable solar site, our ability to obtain requisite land use rights with respect to the site is subject to growing competition from other solar power producers that may have better access to local government support, financial or other resources to locate and obtain land use rights of such sites. Our competitors may impede our development efforts by acquiring control of all or a portion of a solar site we seek to develop. If we were unable to find or obtain land use rights for suitable solar sites, our ability might be harmed to develop new solar projects on a timely basis or at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not compete effectively in the bidding process for solar projects.

Our solar projects are frequently awarded through a competitive bidding process. We compete for project awards based on, among other things, pricing, technical and engineering expertise, past experience, track record and financing resources and capabilities. It is difficult to predict whether and when we will be awarded

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a new solar project. The bidding and selection process are affected by a number of factors, including factors which may be beyond our control, such as market conditions or government incentive programs. Any increase in competition during the bidding process or reduction in our competitive capabilities could have a significant adverse impact on our market share and on the margins we generate from our projects.

We rely on local grid companies for grid connection and grid companies may not have adequate transmission capacity or may be unwilling to purchase and transmit electricity generated by our solar power plants. In addition, the on-grid tariff and preferential tax treatment applicable to us are subject to changes.

We must obtain consents from local grid companies to connect our solar power plants to their power grids before constructing an on-grid integrated solar system. Such consent depends on a number of external factors, including the availability of existing grids with adequate transmission capacity, progress of grid construction or system upgrades, the distance between our preferred sites and the local grids, and the costs of additional interconnection facilities. Many of these factors are beyond our control. We may not be able to obtain all necessary consents for our new solar power system integration projects in a timely manner, or at all.

Further, under the current regulatory framework in the PRC, grid companies generally must purchase and dispatch all electricity generated by renewable energy producers within the coverage of their grids. Solar power stations with grid connection voltage of not more than 10 Kilovolts and installation capacity of not more than 6 MW are all allowed to apply for connection to large grid, with State Grid Corporation of China offering free connection service throughout the entire process. In case of PV power generation projects connected to public grids, grid companies are responsible for investment and construction of the connection projects and related modification of public grids, and for PV power generation projects connected to users’ end through the public grid, grid companies are responsible for investment and construction of public grids’ modification related to the connection. However, we cannot assure you that local grid companies will comply with these obligations at all times or at all. In addition, solar power plants and other renewable energy facilities of our competitors located near our solar power system integration projects may compete with us to secure grid connections. Grid companies may not have adequate transmission capacity or may be unwilling to purchase and transmit electricity generated by our solar power plants. We may not be able to dispatch electricity when our solar power system integration projects commence operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our revenue and results of operations.

In addition, the on-grid tariff and preferential tax treatment applicable to us are subject to changes. Historically, there was no national feed-in tariff mechanism for on-grid solar power plants. In July 2011, the NDRC launched the unified pricing mechanism for on-grid solar power plants in China. Pursuant to the unified pricing mechanism, the on-grid tariff (including value added tax) for on-grid solar power plants either approved after July 1, 2011 or completed after December 31, 2011 was RMB1.00 per kWh (excluding on-grid solar power plants located in Tibet). For the on-grid solar power plants sponsored by central government subsidies, the desulphurized coal benchmark price shall apply. On August 30, 2013, the Price Department of the NDRC released new subsidy details for solar projects in China. Transmission-grid-connected projects will receive a feed-in-tariff of RMB0.90 to RMB1.00 per kWh, whereas distribution-grid-connected projects will receive a premium of RMB0.42 per kWh in addition to the desulphurized coal benchmark price. Furthermore, from October 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015, taxpayers selling electricity products produced themselves using solar energy are entitled to a 50% immediate refund when they pay value added tax. However, we cannot assure you that the tariffs or preferential tax treatment for solar power projects will not decrease or expire in the future. The occurrence of any of the foregoing may cause us to substantially change our planned projects, incur significant costs and increase the risk of our future investment, and materially and adversely affect our business prospects and results of our on-grid solar power plant and solar system integration service business.

The oversupply of solar cells and modules in the solar industry may cause substantial downward pressure on the prices of our products and reduce our revenue and earnings.

The solar industry experienced an oversupply of high-purity silicon in 2009, which contributed to an oversupply of solar wafers, cells and modules and resulted in substantial downward pressure on prices throughout the value chain in 2009. However, strong demand in 2010 stabilized prices across the value chain, particularly in the second half of 2010, and, polysilicon and solar module, cell and wafer pricing increased. In

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2011, the solar industry again experienced oversupply across the value chain, and by the end of the year, solar module, cell and wafer pricing had decreased. Demand for solar products remained soft in 2012 and at the end of 2012, solar module, cell and wafer pricing had all further decreased.

Our average module selling price decreased from RMB8.7 per watt for 2011 to RMB4.3 per watt for 2012 and RMB3.74 (US$0.61 per watt) for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, in large part because the supply of solar cells and modules increased more quickly than demand. Continued increases in solar module production in excess of market demand may result in further downward pressure on the price of solar cells and modules, including our products. Increasing competition could also result in us losing sales or market share. If we are unable, on an ongoing basis, to procure silicon, solar wafers and solar cells at reasonable prices, or mark up the price of our solar modules to cover our manufacturing and operating costs, our revenue and gross margin will be adversely impacted, either due to higher costs compared to our competitors or due to inventory write-downs, or both. In addition, our market share may decline if our competitors are able to price their products more competitively.

Revisions, reductions or the elimination of government subsidies and economic incentives for the use and development of solar power products may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and business prospects.

We believe that market demand for solar power and solar power products in the near term will continue to substantially depend on the availability of government incentives because the cost of solar power currently exceeds, and we believe will continue to exceed in the near term, the cost of conventional fossil fuel energy and certain non-solar renewable energy. We received government grants totaling RMB70.7 million, RMB117.2 million, RMB160.7 million and RMB49.2 million (US$8.0 million) for 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively, which included government grants for assets, our expansion of production scale, technology upgrades, the development of export markets and the development of solar projects. We cannot assure you that we will continue to receive a similar amount or any amount of government subsidy in future periods.

Various governments have used policy initiatives to encourage or accelerate the development and adoption of solar power and other renewable energy sources, including: certain countries in Europe, notably Italy, Germany, France, Belgium and Spain; certain countries in Asia, including China, Japan, India and South Korea; countries in North America, such as the United States and Canada; as well as Australia and South Africa. Recently, local governments and the national government in China have enacted new policies to support solar developments in China. See “Summary — Recent Industry Developments”. Examples of government-sponsored financial incentives to promote solar power include capital cost rebates, feed-in tariffs, tax credits, net metering and other incentives to end-users, distributors, project developers, system integrators and manufacturers of solar power products.

Governments may reduce or eliminate existing incentive programs for political, financial or other reasons, which will be difficult for us to predict. Reductions in feed-in tariff programs may result in a significant fall in the price of and demand for solar power products. For example, subsidies have been reduced or eliminated in some countries such as Germany, Italy, Spain and Canada. The German market represents a major portion of the world’s solar market due in large part to government policies that established high feed-in tariff rates. However, since 2010, the German government has introduced legislation to reduce the feed-in-tariff program due to the strong growth of its domestic solar market. In 2009, the Spanish government continued reductions in the feed-in tariff as a result of its government’s spending cut backs, which resulted in a weakened solar market. In 2010, Italy also announced annual reductions to feed-in tariffs beginning in 2011 in an effort to impede overheating of its solar market. In 2011 and 2012, several countries, including Germany, Italy, Spain, our three largest export markets, and certain other major markets for solar power and solar power products, such as Greece, France and Belgium, continued to reduce their feed-in tariffs as well as other incentive measures.

In the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we generated 54.8% of our total revenue from overseas markets, and Germany, South Africa and Singapore, our three largest export markets, represented 11.4%, 10.0% and 7.6% of our total revenue, respectively. As a result, any significant reduction in the scope or discontinuation of government incentive programs in the overseas markets, especially where our major

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customers are located, could cause demand for our products and our revenue to decline and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In addition, the announcement of a significant reduction in incentives in any major market may have an adverse effect on the trading price of our ADSs.

Volatility in the prices of silicon raw materials makes our procurement planning challenging and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

The prices of polysilicon, the essential raw material for solar cell and module products and silicon wafers have been subject to significant volatility. Historically, increases in the price of polysilicon had increased our production costs. Since the first half of 2010, as a result of the growth of newly available polysilicon manufacturing capacity worldwide, there has been an increased supply of polysilicon, which has driven down its price and the price of its downstream products. Since the second half of 2011, the prices of polysilicon and silicon wafers further fell significantly. As the polysilicon raw materials became more accessible to producers, the global production and supply of solar cell and module products has experienced considerable growth, which has imposed substantial downward pressure on the price of solar module products, including our solar module products. From 2010 to 2012, the prices of solar products declined, and prices began to stabilize in the first half of 2013. However, the price of solar products has started smoothly and rose slightly since 2013, we cannot assure you that the supply of solar cells and modules will not further increase or the prices of solar module products will not continue to decline due to the oversupply in the market.

We expect that the prices of virgin polysilicon feedstock may continue to be subject to volatility, making our procurement planning challenging. For example, if we refrain from entering into fixed-price, long-term supply contracts, we may miss the opportunities to secure long-term supplies of virgin polysilicon at favorable prices if the price of virgin polysilicon increases significantly in the future. On the other hand, if we enter into more fixed-price, long-term supply contracts, we may not be able to renegotiate or otherwise adjust the purchase prices under such long-term supply contracts if the price declines. As a result, our cost of silicon raw materials could be higher than that of our competitors who source their supply of silicon raw materials through floating-price arrangements or spot market purchases. To the extent we may not be able to fully pass on higher costs and expenses to our customers, our profit margins, results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

We may not be able to obtain sufficient silicon raw materials in a timely manner or on commercially reasonable terms, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

In 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, our five largest suppliers accounted for approximately 47.4%, 57.8%, 63.2% and 66.1%, respectively, of our total silicon purchases by value. In the nine months ended September 30, 2013, two of our suppliers individually accounted for more than 10% and our largest supplier accounted for 33.9% of our total silicon purchases by value. In 2012, four of our suppliers individually accounted for more than 10% and our largest supplier accounted for 20.5% of our total silicon purchases by value.

Although the global supply of polysilicon has increased significantly, we may experience interruption to our supply of silicon raw materials or late delivery in the future for the following reasons, among others:

suppliers under our silicon material supply contracts may delay deliveries for a significant period of time without incurring penalties;
our virgin polysilicon suppliers may not be able to meet our production needs consistently or on a timely basis;
compared with us, some of our competitors who also purchase virgin polysilicon from our suppliers have longer and stronger relationships with and have greater buying power and bargaining leverage over some of our key suppliers; and
our supply of silicon raw materials is subject to the business risk of our suppliers, some of whom have limited operating history and limited financial resources, and one or more of which could go out of business for reasons beyond our control in the current economic environment.

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Our failure to obtain the required amounts of silicon raw materials in a timely manner and on commercially reasonable terms could increase our manufacturing costs and substantially limit our ability to meet our contractual obligations to our customers. Any failure to meet such obligations could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, ability to retain customers, market share, business and results of operations and may subject us to claims from our customers and other disputes. Furthermore, our failure to obtain sufficient silicon raw materials would result in under-utilization of our production facilities and an increase in our marginal production costs. Any of the above events could have a material adverse effect on our growth, profitability and results of operations.

The loss of, or a significant reduction in orders from, any of our customers could significantly reduce our revenue and harm our results of operations.

In 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, sales to our top five customers represented 29.8%, 33.6%, 18.3% and 34.9%of our total revenue, respectively. In the nine months ended September 30, 2013, one of our customers individually accounted for 11.4% of our total revenue. In 2012, no customer generated sales that individually exceeded 10% of our total revenue. Our relationships with our key customers for solar modules have been developed over a relatively short period of time and are generally in nascent stages. We cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to generate significant revenue from these customers or that we will be able to maintain these customer relationships. In addition, we purchase solar wafers and cells and silicon raw materials through toll manufacturing arrangements that require us to make significant capital commitments to support our estimated production output. In the event our customers cancel their orders, we may not be able to recoup prepayments made to suppliers, which could adversely influence our financial condition and results of operations. The loss of sales to any of these customers could also have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects and results of operations.

Our future success depends in part on our ability to expand our business downstream. Any failure to successfully implement this strategy could have a material adverse effect on our growth, business prospects and results of operations in future periods.

We have been expanding our business downstream domestically. These expansion plans may include investments in downstream companies and joint ventures and alliances with third parties for balance of system technologies, engineering, procurement and construction services, and related financing needs. These plans may require significant capital expenditures, which could be used in pursuit of other opportunities and investments. Additionally, our experience in the solar power products manufacturing industry may not be as relevant or applicable downstream. We may also face intense competition from companies with greater experience or established presence in the targeted downstream markets or competition from our industry peers with similar expansion plans. Furthermore, we may not be able to manage or control entities which we invest in or provide adequate resources to such entities to maximize the return on our investments. We may also consider acquisitions of existing downstream players, in which we may face difficulties related to the integration of the operations and personnel of acquired businesses and the division of resources between our existing and acquired downstream operations.

We cannot assure you that we will be successful in expanding our business into downstream markets along the solar power product value chain. Any failure to successfully identify, execute and integrate our acquisitions, investments, joint ventures and alliances as part of entering into downstream markets may have a material adverse impact on our growth, business prospects and results of operations, which could lead to a decline in the price of our ADSs.

We manufacture our products in two locations in China, which exposes us to various risks relating to long distance transportation of our silicon wafers and solar cells in the manufacturing process.

The geographical separation of our manufacturing facilities necessitates constant long distance transportation of substantial volumes of our silicon wafers and solar cells between Shangrao, Jiangxi Province and Haining, Zhejiang Province. We produce and will continue to produce silicon ingots, silicon wafers and most of our solar modules in our manufacturing facilities in Shangrao, while also producing solar cells and solar modules in our manufacturing facilities in Haining. As a result, we transport a substantial volume of our silicon wafers from Shangrao to Haining to be processed into solar cells and a substantial volume of our solar

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cells from Haining back to Shangrao to be processed into solar modules. The distance between Shangrao and Haining is approximately 410 kilometers and the two cities are connected by roads and railway. The constant long distance transportation of a large volume of our silicon wafers and solar cells may expose us to various risks, including (i) increases in transportation costs, (ii) loss of our silicon wafers or solar cells as a result of any accidents that may occur in the transportation process; (iii) delays in the transportation of our silicon wafers or solar cells as a result of any severe weather conditions, natural disasters or other conditions adversely affecting road traffic between Haining and Shangrao; and (iv) disruptions to our production of solar cells and solar modules as a result of delays in the transportation of our silicon wafers and solar cells. Any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Prepayment arrangements to suppliers for the procurement of silicon raw materials expose us to the credit risks of such suppliers and may also significantly increase our costs and expenses, which could in turn have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.

Our supply contracts generally include prepayment obligations for the procurement of silicon raw materials. As of September 30, 2013, we had approximately RMB92.8 million (US$15.2 million) of advances to suppliers. We generally do not receive collateral to secure such payments for these contracts and the collateral we received are deeply subordinated and shared with all other customers and other senior lenders of the supplier.

Our prepayments, secured or unsecured, expose us to the credit risks of our suppliers, and reduce our chances of obtaining the return of such prepayments in the event that our suppliers become insolvent or bankrupt. Moreover, we may have difficulty recovering such prepayments if any of our suppliers fails to fulfill its contractual delivery obligations to us. Accordingly, a default by our suppliers to whom we have made substantial prepayment may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. For example, on June 13, 2012, we terminated our supply agreement with one of our former polysilicon providers, Hoku Materials, Inc., or Hoku, in light of adverse developments in Hoku’s operations. We did not receive any shipments from Hoku throughout the term of the supply agreement. Upon the termination of the supply agreement, we demanded that Hoku return all outstanding prepayments as well as pay associated charges and interests, but we have not yet received such payments. As a result, we fully provided for RMB129.8 million (US$21.2 million) of the outstanding balance of prepayments we made to Hoku. In addition, in January 2013, we notified Wuxi Zhongcai Technological Co. Ltd., or Wuxi Zhongcai, another of our former polysilicon providers, to terminate our long-term supply agreement, in response to adverse developments in Wuxi Zhongcai’s business. In February 2013, we became involved in litigation with Wuxi Zhongcai over the supply agreement. We have fully provided for RMB93.2 million (US$15.2 million) of the outstanding balance of prepayments to Wuxi Zhongcai.

Decreases in the price of silicon raw materials and solar power products, including solar modules, may result in additional provisions for inventory losses.

We typically plan our production and inventory levels based on our forecasts of customer demand, which may be unpredictable and can fluctuate materially. Recent market volatility has made it increasingly difficult for us to accurately forecast future product demand trends. Due to the decrease in the prices of silicon raw materials and solar power products, including solar modules, which have been our principal products since 2010, we recorded inventory provisions of RMB29.6 million, RMB201.7 million, RMB332.3 million and RMB117.7 million (US$19.2 million) in 2010, 2011, 2012 and for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively. If the prices of silicon materials and solar power problems continue to decrease, the carrying value of our existing inventory may exceed its market price in future periods, thus requiring us to make additional provisions for inventory valuation, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations.

Increases in electricity costs or a shortage or disruption of electricity supply may adversely affect our business.

We consume a significant amount of electricity in our operations. Electricity prices in China have increased in the past few years and are expected to continue to increase in the future. Our average per kWh electricity prices were RMB0.678, RMB0.675, RMB0.734 and RMB0.700 in the 2010, 2011, 2012 and the

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nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively. Our electricity prices decreased during 2013, as the local electricity bureau reduced the electricity price, as the amount of electricity delivered increased. Our electricity costs may become substantially higher than our competitors, which could diminish our competitive advantage and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, with the rapid development of the PRC economy, demand for electricity has continued to increase. There have been shortages or disruptions in electricity supply in various regions across China, especially during peak seasons, such as the summer, or when there are severe weather conditions. We cannot assure you that there will not be disruptions or shortages in our electricity supply or that there will be sufficient electricity available to us to meet our future requirements. Increases in electricity costs, shortages or disruptions in electricity supply may significantly disrupt our normal operations, cause us to incur additional costs and adversely affect our profitability.

We face intense competition in solar power product markets. If we fail to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with existing or new competitors, our business prospects and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

The markets for solar power products are intensely competitive. We compete with manufacturers of solar power products such as Trina Solar Ltd., or Trina, Yingli Green Energy Holding Co., Ltd., or Yingli Green Energy, Canadian Solar Inc. and ReneSola Ltd. in a continuously evolving market. Recently, some downstream manufacturers have also built out or expanded their silicon wafer or solar cell production operations. Some of these competitors are also our customers and suppliers.

Some of our current and potential competitors have a longer operating history, stronger brand recognition, more established relationships with customers, greater financial and other resources, a larger customer base, better access to raw materials and greater economies of scale than we do. Furthermore, some of our competitors are integrated players in the solar industry that engage in the production of virgin polysilicon. Their business models may give them competitive advantages as these integrated players place less reliance on the upstream suppliers, downstream customers or both.

We may also face extensive competition in developing solar power projects and providing solar system integration services from competitors such as Trina, Yingli Green Energy, Canadian Solar Inc. and ReneSola Ltd. Some of our potential competitors in that market may have a longer history, more extensive experience in this industry, greater financial and other resources, stronger brand recognition, stronger relationships with customers and greater economies of scale than we do. Moreover, the key barriers to entry into the project development and system integration business at present consist of availability of financing, availability of experienced technicians and executives who are familiar with the industry and the implementation of market access standards. If these barriers disappear or become more easily surmountable, new competitors may successfully enter into the market, resulting in the loss of our market share and increased price competition, which could adversely affect our operating and net margins.

The solar industry faces competition from other types of renewable and non-renewable power industries.

The solar industry faces competition from other renewable energy companies and non-renewable power industries, including nuclear energy and fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum and natural gas. Technological innovations in these other forms of energy may reduce their costs or increase their safety. Large-scale new deposits of fossil fuel may be discovered, which could reduce their costs. Local governments may decide to strengthen their support for other renewable energy sources, such as wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and ocean power, and reduce their support for the solar industry. The inability to compete successfully against producers of other forms of power or otherwise enter into power purchase agreements favorable to us would negatively affect our ability to develop and finance our projects and negatively impact our revenue.

Technological changes in the solar power industry could render our products uncompetitive or obsolete, which could reduce our market share and cause our revenue and net income to decline.

The solar power industry is characterized by evolving technologies and standards. These technological evolutions and developments place increasing demands on the improvement of our products, such as solar cells with higher conversion efficiency and larger and thinner silicon wafers and solar cells. Other companies

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may develop production technologies that enable them to produce silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules with higher conversion efficiencies at a lower cost than our products. Some of our competitors are developing alternative and competing solar technologies that may require significantly less silicon than crystalline silicon wafers and solar cells, or no silicon at all. Technologies developed or adopted by others may prove more advantageous than ours for commercialization of solar power products and may render our products obsolete. As a result, we may need to invest significant resources in research and development to maintain our market position, keep pace with technological advances in the solar power industry, and effectively compete in the future. Our failure to further refine and enhance our products and processes or to keep pace with evolving technologies and industry standards could cause our products to become uncompetitive or obsolete, which could materially and adversely reduce our market share and affect our results of operations.

Existing regulations and policies and changes to these regulations and policies may present technical, regulatory and economic barriers to the purchase and use of solar power products, which may significantly reduce demand for our products.

The market for electricity generation products is heavily influenced by government regulations and policies concerning the electric utility industry, as well as by policies adopted by electric utility companies. These regulations and policies often relate to electricity pricing and technical interconnection requirements for customer-owned electricity generation. In a number of countries, these regulations and policies are being modified and may continue to be modified. Customer purchases of, or further investment in the research and development of, alternative energy sources, including solar power technology, could be deterred by these regulations and policies, which could result in a significant reduction in the demand for our products. For example, without a regulatory mandated exception for solar power systems, utility customers may be charged interconnection or standby fees for putting distributed power generation on the electric utility grid. These fees could increase the cost of and reduce the demand for solar power, thereby harming our business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, we anticipate that solar power products and their installation will be subject to oversight and regulation in accordance with national and local regulations relating to building codes, safety, environmental protection, utility interconnection, and metering and related matters. Any new government regulations or utility policies pertaining to solar power products may result in significant additional expenses to the users of solar power products and, as a result, could eventually cause a significant reduction in demand for our products.

We may face termination and late charges and risks relating to the termination and amendment of certain equipment purchases contracts.

We transact with a limited number of equipment suppliers for all our principal manufacturing equipment and spare parts, including our silicon ingot furnaces, squaring machines, wire saws, diffusion furnaces, firing furnaces and screen print machine. In the nine months ended September 30, 2013, our top three equipment suppliers included, Zhejiang Aide Energy Co, Ltd, Jsun International Limited and Jiaxi Shanchua Machinery Co. Ltd. These suppliers have supplied 43.6% of our current principal equipment and spare parts. We have entered into purchase agreements for purchasing additional manufacturing equipment. As we have shifted our focus from capacity expansion to improving efficiency, we may terminate these equipment purchase agreements or revise their terms in line with our new plan and as a result, may be subject to cancellation, late charges or forfeiture of prepayments. For example, we made a prepayment of RMB44.2 million (US$7.2 million) to Miyamoto for the purchase of equipment for capacity expansion. As we were focusing on improving our efficiency, we did not place any purchase orders for equipment from Miyamoto in 2012 and we made a provision of RMB44.2 million (US$7.2 million) in 2012 for the balance of our prepayments.

We may rely on certain major suppliers to provide a substantial portion of the principal manufacturing equipment and spare parts if we implement any expansion plan in the future. If we fail to develop or maintain our relationships with these and other equipment suppliers, or should any of our major equipment suppliers encounter difficulties in the manufacturing or shipment of its equipment or spare parts to us, including due to natural disasters or otherwise fail to supply equipment or spare parts according to our requirements, it will be difficult for us to find alternative providers for such equipment on a timely basis and on commercially reasonable terms. As a result, our production and result of operation could be adversely affected.

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Selling our products on credit terms may increase our working capital requirements and expose us to the credit risk of our customers.

To accommodate and retain customers in the negative market environment, many solar module manufacturers, including us, shifted from demanding advance payments towards increasing credit sales and providing longer credit terms to both existing and new customers. Starting from the third quarter of 2011, we began to offer new customers credit terms of 60 to 120 days as well as extend similar credit terms to certain existing customers under new contracts. Most of our sales are made on credit terms and we allow our customers to make payments after a certain period of time subsequent to the delivery of our products. The increased use of credit sales and the longer credit terms have led to increased accounts receivable turnover and bad debt risks. Our accounts receivable turnover were 45 days, 54 days, 129 days and 97 days in 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively. In particular, in 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, our accounts receivable turnover in Germany were 30 days, 69 days, 70 days and 99 days, respectively, our accounts receivable turnover in South Africa were nil, nil, nil and 52 days, respectively, and our accounts receivable turnover in China were 4 days, 50 days, 119 days and 135 days, respectively. Correspondingly, we recorded significantly higher provisions for accounts receivable. We recorded provisions for accounts receivable of RMB0.4 million, RMB179.7 million, RMB673.7 million and RMB507.0 million as of December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 and September 30, 2013, respectively. We recorded bad debt provisions of RMB507.0 million (US$82.9 million) for the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

We expect the use of credit sales to continue in the industry and this trend will continue to negatively affect our liquidity and our accounts receivable turnover. Selling our products on credit terms has increased, and may continue to increase our working capital requirements, which may negatively impact our short-term liquidity. We may not be able to maintain adequate working capital primarily through cash generated from our operating activities and may need to secure additional financing for our working capital requirements. Based on our ongoing assessment of the recoverability of our outstanding accounts receivable, we may need to continue to provide for doubtful accounts and write off overdue accounts receivable we determine as not collectible. If we fail to secure additional financing on a timely basis on terms acceptable to us or at all, our financial conditions, results of operations and liquidity may be adversely affected. In addition, we are exposed to the credit risk of customers to which we have made credit sales in the event that any of such customers becomes insolvent or bankrupt or otherwise does not make timely payments.

We face risks associated with the marketing, distribution and sale of our products internationally, and if we are unable to effectively manage these risks our ability to expand our business abroad may be restricted.

We commenced export sales in May 2008 when we exported a small portion of our products to Hong Kong, and have since continued to increase export sales. In 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we generated 54.5% and 54.8%, respectively, of our total revenue from export sales and 54.9% and 55.1%, respectively, of our total revenue were denominated in foreign currencies, including U.S. dollars and euros. We plan to continue to increase sales outside China and expand our customer base overseas. However, the marketing, distribution and sale of our products in export markets may expose us to a number of risks, including those associated with:

fluctuations in currency exchange rates;
costs associated with understanding local markets and trends;
marketing and distribution costs;
customer services and support costs;
risk management and internal control structures for our overseas operations;
compliance with the different commercial, environmental and legal requirements;
obtaining or maintaining certifications for our products or services;
maintaining our reputation as an environmentally friendly enterprise for our products or services;
obtaining, maintaining or enforcing intellectual property rights;

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changes in prevailing economic conditions and regulatory requirements;
transportation and freight costs;
employing and retaining sales personnel who are knowledgeable about, and can function effectively in, export markets;
trade barriers such as export requirements, tariffs, taxes and other restrictions and expenses, which could increase the prices of our products and make us less competitive in some countries;
challenges due to our unfamiliarity with local laws, regulation and policies, our absence of significant operating experience in local market, increased cost associated with establishment of overseas subsidiaries and maintaining a multi-national organizational structure; and
other various risks that are beyond our control.

Our exports to foreign markets, such as Europe, have increased significantly during the last three years, increasing the risk that any unfavorable trade policies in foreign markets could affect the sale of our products. As our manufacturing bases are located in China, we may be affected by any claims of unfair trade practices that are brought against the PRC government through the imposition of tariffs, non-tariff barriers to trade or other trade remedies. For example, in 2012, we became subject to anti-dumping and countervailing (i.e., anti-subsidy) duties imposed by the U.S. government and, in 2013, we became subject to annual import quotas imposed by the European Commission. See “— We are subject to anti-dumping and countervailing duties imposed by the U.S. government and quotas imposed by the European Union.” Any significant changes in international trade policies, practices or trade remedies, especially those instituted in our target markets or markets where our major customers are located, could increase the price of our products compared to our competitors or decrease our customers’ demand for our products, which may adversely affect our business prospects and results of operations.

We are subject to anti-dumping and countervailing duties imposed by the U.S. government and quotas imposed by the European Union.

Our direct sales to the U.S. market accounted for 2.8% of our total revenue in 2012 and 4.4% of our total revenue in the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

In March 2012, the U.S. Commerce Department announced a preliminary decision to impose countervailing duties. In December of 2012, the United States Department of Commerce imposed tariffs on a number of China-based solar panels, including anti-dumping duties of 24.48% and countervailing duties of 15.24% on our crystalline silicon PV cells, whether or not assembled into modules from the People's Republic of China. The United States International Trade Commission determined that imports of crystalline silicon PV cells and modules from China “materially injure” a U.S. industry, but the USITC did not make an affirmative determination regarding critical circumstances. As a result, after the publication of the preliminary determinations by the Department of Commerce, we face a counter-veiling duty at 15.24% and an anti-dumping duty at 24.48% for the imports of crystalline silicon PV cells, whether or not assembled into modules from the People's Republic of China. An export subsidy rate of 10.54% is deducted from the anti-dumping duty calculation to avoid double application. Our sales in U.S. may be adversely affected by these anti-dumping and countervailing duties, which may in turn materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have made provisions of RMB6.4 million (US$1.1 million) for preliminary U.S. countervailing and anti-dumping duties in the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

Our direct sales to the European market accounted for 48.0% of our total revenue in 2012 and 20.5% of our total revenue in the nine months ended September 30, 2013. On June 6, 2013, the EU imposed provisional anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar panels, including JinkoSolar’s products, at the starting rate of 11.8% until August 5, 2013, and followed by an increased rate averaging 47.6%.

On July 27, 2013, the EU and Chinese trade negotiators announced that a price undertaking has been reached pursuant to which Chinese manufacturers, including JinkoSolar, would limit their exports of solar panels to the EU and for no less than a minimum price, in exchange for the EU agreeing to forgo the imposition of anti-dumping duties on these solar panels from China. The offer was approved by the European Commission on August 2, 2013. The CCCME is responsible for allocating the quota among Chinese export

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producers, and JinkoSolar has been allocated a portion of the quota. Solar panels imported exceeding the annual quota will be subject to anti-dumping duties. On December 5, 2013, the European Council announced its final decision imposing definitive anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on imports of crystalline silicon PV cells and modules originating from or consigned from China. An average duty of 47.7%, consisting of the anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties, will be applied for a period of two years beginning on December 6, 2013 to Chinese solar panel exporters who cooperated with the European Commission’s investigations. On the same day, the European Commission announced its decision to confirm the acceptance of the price undertaking offered by Chinese export producers, including JinkoSolar, with CCCME in connection with the anti-dumping proceeding and to extend the price undertaking to the anti-subsidy proceeding, which will exempt them from both anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties.

The EU is one of the most important market for solar products. Anti-dumping, countervailing duties or both imposed on imports of our products into the EU could materially and adversely affect our affiliated EU import operations, increase our cost of selling into the EU, and adversely affect our EU export sales.

On July 18, 2013, China's Ministry of Commerce announced that it would enact preliminary tariffs on imports of solar-grade polysilicon at rates up to 57% for U.S. suppliers and 48.7% for South Korean suppliers. While we do not expect these tariffs to materially increase our cost of production in 2013 as we do not expect to source any significant amount of our polysilicon from the United States or South Korea during 2013, we cannot guarantee that these tariffs will not have a material and adverse effect in the event we begin to source a significant amount of polysilicon from these countries.

Imposition of anti-dumping and countervailing orders in one or more markets may result in additional costs to us, our customers or both, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

We are exposed to various risks related to legal or administrative proceedings or claims that could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and reputation, and may cause loss of business.

Litigation in general can be expensive, lengthy and disruptive to normal business operations. Moreover, the results of complex legal proceedings are difficult to predict. We and/or our directors and officers may be involved in allegations, litigation or legal or administrative proceedings in the from time to time.

On October 11, 2011, JinkoSolar, along with our directors and officers at the time of our initial public offering, or the Individual Defendants, and the underwriters of our initial public offering were named as defendants in a putative shareholder class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York captioned Marco Peters v. JinkoSolar Holding Co., Ltd., et al., Case No. 11-CV-7133 (S.D.N.Y.). In an amended complaint filed on June 1, 2012, the plaintiff, representing a class of all purchasers and acquirers of ADSs of JinkoSolar between May 13, 2010 and September 22, 2011, inclusive, alleged that the defendants violated Sections 11 and 12(a)(2) of the Securities Act and Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, by making material misstatements or failing to disclose material information regarding, among other things, JinkoSolar’s compliance with environmental regulations at its Haining facility. The amended complaint also asserted claims against the Individual Defendants for control person liability under Section 15 of the Securities Act and Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act. On August 1, 2012, JinkoSolar filed a motion to dismiss the amended complaint, as did Stephen Markscheid, who was the only Individual Defendant to have been served in the action. On the same date, the underwriter defendants filed a joinder to JinkoSolar’s motion to dismiss. On January 22, 2013, the court issued a Memorandum and Order granting JinkoSolar’s and Stephen Markscheid’s motions to dismiss in their entirety and dismissing the amended complaint as against all defendants. The Court entered judgment in favor of defendants on the same date. On February 19, 2013, lead plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal from the court’s January 22, 2013 Memorandum and Order and Judgment. Oral argument on the appeal was heard on September 18, 2013. Although JinkoSolar was successful before the district court, we cannot guarantee that the decision will be upheld on appeal.

Regardless of the merits, responding to allegations, litigation or legal or administration proceedings and defending against litigation can be time consuming and costly, and may result in us incurring substantial legal and administrative expenses, as well as divert the attention of our management. Any such allegations, lawsuits

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or proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our business operations. Further, unfavorable outcomes from these claims or lawsuits could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may continue to undertake acquisitions, investments, joint ventures or other strategic alliances, and such undertakings may be unsuccessful.

We have expanded our product lines into solar cells through our acquisition of Zhejiang Jinko in June 2009 and developed solar power projects in China since late 2011. We may in the future continue to grow our operations through acquisitions, participation in joint ventures or other strategic alliances with suppliers or other companies in China and overseas along the solar power industry value chain. Such acquisitions, participation in joint ventures and strategic alliances may expose us to new operational, regulatory, market and geographical risks as well as risks associated with additional capital requirements and diversion of management resources. In particular, our acquisitions may expose us to the following risks:

There may be unforeseen risks relating to the target’s business and operations or liabilities of the target that were not discovered by us through our legal and business due diligence prior to such acquisition. Such undetected risks and liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations in the future.
There is no assurance that we will be able to maintain relationships with previous customers of the target, or develop new customer relationships in the future. Loss of our existing customers or failure to establish relationships with new customers could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Acquisitions will generally divert a significant portion of our management and financial resources from our existing business and the integration of the target’s operations with our existing operations has required, and will continue to require, significant management and financial resources, potentially straining our ability to finance and manage our existing operations.
There is no assurance that the expected synergies from any acquisition or joint venture investment will actually materialize. If we are not successful in the integration of a target’s operations, we may not be able to generate sufficient revenue from its operations to recover costs and expenses of the acquisition.
Acquisition or participation in new joint venture or strategic alliance may involve us in the management of operation in which we do not possess extensive expertise.

The materialization of any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be subject to non-competition or other similar restrictions or arrangements relating to our business.

We may from time to time enter into non-competition, exclusivity or other restrictions or arrangements of a similar nature as part of our sales agreements with our customers. Such restrictions or arrangements may significantly hinder our ability to sell additional products, or enter into sales agreements with new or existing customers that plan to sell our products, in certain markets. As a result, such restrictions or arrangements may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We typically require a significant amount of cash to meet our capital requirements, including the expansion of our production capacity and investments in our solar projects, as well as to fund our operations. As of September 30, 2013, we had approximately RMB2.02 billion (US$330.2 million) in outstanding short-term borrowings (including the current portion of long-term bank borrowings) and RMB383 million (US$62.6 million) in outstanding long-term bank borrowings (excluding the current portion and deferred financing cost).

In addition, we have substantial repayment obligations under the debt securities we issued. On May 17, 2011, we issued convertible senior notes in the principal amount of US$125 million due 2016, bearing an

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annual interest rate of 4.00%. The notes have an option for holders to require us to repurchase their notes in May 2014 for the principal of the notes plus accrued and unpaid interest, to qualified institutional buyers under Rule 144A of the Securities Act. On December 5, 2011, we repurchased an aggregate principal amount of US$2.0 million of such notes for a total consideration of RMB5.2 million. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, our convertible senior notes with principal amount of US$123 million are outstanding. On April 23, 2012, Jiangxi Jinko issued unsecured one-year short-term bonds with a principal amount of RMB300 million which was repaid on April 23, 2013. On January 29, 2013, Jiangxi Jinko issued six-year bonds with a principal amount of RMB800 million (US$130.7 million), bearing a fixed annual interest rate of 8.99%. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we have credit facilities with various banks available. At the end of the third year in the life of the bonds, Jiangxi Jinko has the option to raise the interest rate by up to 100 basis points, and the bondholders will have the right to require Jiangxi Jinko to repurchase all or part of their bonds at such time. On March 19, 2013, we entered into loan facilities for an aggregate principal amount of RMB360 million (US$58.8 million) with a term of 15 years with China Development Bank to develop solar power projects, which we fully drew down on April 3, 2013. On January 6, 2014, we entered into another loan facility for an aggregate principal amount of RMB400 million (US$65.3 million) also for a term of 15 years with China Development Bank for development of PV projects. In light of the amount of bank borrowings and bonds due in the near term future and possible exercise of the put option of the convertible senior notes on May 14, 2014, sufficient funds may not be available to meet our payment obligations.

This level of debt and the imminent repayment of our notes and other bank borrowings could have significant consequences on our operations, including:

reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes as a result of our debt service obligations, and limiting our ability to obtain additional financing;
limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, and increasing our vulnerability to, changes in our business, the industry in which we operate and the general economy; and
potentially increasing the cost of any additional financing.

Any of these factors and other consequences that may result from our substantial indebtedness could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations as well as our ability to meet our payment obligations under our debt.

In addition, we may incur gain or loss in relation to our change in the fair value of our financial instruments. For example, in 2012, we had net loss from a change in fair value of convertible senior notes and capped call options of RMB97.2 million. The change in fair value of financial instruments may fluctuate significantly from period to period due to factors that are largely beyond our control, and may result in us recording substantial gains or losses as a result of such changes. As a result of the foregoing, you may not be able to rely on period to period comparisons of our operating results as an indication of our future performance.

Our failure to maintain sufficient collateral under certain pledge contracts for our short-term bank loans may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

As of September 30, 2013, Jiangxi Jinko had short-term bank borrowings of RMB90 million (US$14.7 million) secured by certain of our inventory. The net book value of the inventory at the time of the pledge contracts amounted to approximately RMB212.7 million (US$34.8 million). Although the net book value of the inventory as of September 30, 2013 exceeded the amount of the pledge required, we cannot assure you that we will not be requested by the pledgees to provide additional collateral to bring the value of the collateral to the level required by the pledgees if our inventory depreciates in the future. If we fail to provide additional collateral, the pledgees will be entitled to require the immediate repayment of the outstanding bank loans. In addition, the pledgees may auction or sell the inventory and negotiate with us to apply the proceeds from the auction or sale to the repayment of the underlying loan. Furthermore, we may be subject to liquidated damages pursuant to relevant pledge contracts. Although the pledgees have conducted regular site inspections on our inventory since the pledge contracts were executed, they have not requested us

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to provide additional collateral or take other remedial actions. However, we cannot assure you the pledgees will not require us to provide additional collateral in the future or take other remedial actions or otherwise enforce their rights under the pledge contracts and loan agreements. If any of the foregoing occurs, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

We rely principally on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our principal operating subsidiaries, Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko, and limitations on their ability to pay dividends to us could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

We are a holding company and rely principally on dividends paid by our principal operating subsidiaries, Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko, for cash requirements. Zhejiang Jinko entered into loan agreements with a group of PRC banks on March 31, 2011, which were subsequently amended in August 2011. Pursuant to these loan agreements, Zhejiang Jinko obtained two syndicated loans with an aggregate principal amount of RMB600.0 million from a group of PRC banks and, as of September 30, 2013, we had outstanding borrowings under such syndicated loans of RMB168.0 million (US$27.5million). Pursuant to the syndicated loan agreements, Zhejiang Jinko may pay dividends only if it complies with the agreed repayment schedule. Although such debt was incurred by Zhejiang Jinko, we cannot assure you that Jiangxi Jinko will not also enter into instruments that may restrict dividends or other distribution to us on our equity interests in the future. In order to finance similar transactions, the share capital of our principal operating subsidiaries has been commonly used as pledges for securing loans, which may limit dividends or other distributions to us.

Furthermore, applicable PRC laws, rules and regulations permit payment of dividends by our PRC subsidiaries only out of their retained earnings, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards. Our PRC subsidiaries are required to set aside a certain percentage of their after-tax profit based on PRC accounting standards each year as reserve funds for future development and employee benefits, in accordance with the requirements of relevant laws and provisions in their respective articles of associations. The percentage should not be less than 10%, unless the reserve funds reach 50% of the company’s registered capital. In addition, under PRC laws, our PRC subsidiaries are prohibited from distributing dividends if there is a loss in the current year. As a result, our PRC subsidiaries may be restricted in their ability to transfer any portion of their net income to us whether in the form of dividends, loans or advances. Any limitation on the ability of our subsidiaries to pay dividends to us could materially adversely limit our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our businesses, pay dividends or otherwise fund and conduct our business.

If we are unable to remedy the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud, and investor confidence in our company and the market price of our ADSs may be adversely affected.

As a public company in the United States, we are subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the SOX. As required by Section 404 of the SOX and related rules as promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, we are required to include a report of management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report. In addition, under such rules, our independent registered public accounting firm may be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. As we are a non-accelerated filer for 2012, such attestation was not required in our 2012 Annual Report. In the course of preparing our consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012, our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting and concluded that as of December 31, 2012, our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting were not effective. See “Item 15. Controls and Procedures” included in our 2012 Annual Report for discussion of this material weakness.

Despite our efforts to ensure the integrity of our financial reporting process, we cannot assure you that the material weakness identified in our internal control over financial reporting will be successfully remediated. Furthermore, we cannot assure you that additional deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting will not be identified in the future. Any failure to maintain existing controls or implement new controls could result in additional material weakness and cause us fail to meet our periodic reporting obligations which in turn could cause our ADSs to be delisted or suspended from trading on the NYSE. In

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addition, any such failure could result in material misstatements and adversely affect the results of annual management evaluations regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Any of the foregoing could cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, leading to a decline in the price of our ADSs or lawsuits being filed against us by our shareholders or otherwise harm our reputation. In addition, we may require more resources and incur more costs than currently expected to remediate our identified material weakness or any additional material weakness that may be identified in the future, which may adversely affect our results of operations.

Failure to achieve satisfactory production volumes of our products could result in higher unit production costs.

The production of silicon wafers, solar cells, solar modules, silicon ingots and recovered silicon materials involves complex processes. Deviations in the manufacturing process can cause a substantial decrease in output and, in some cases, disrupt production significantly or result in no output. From time to time, we have experienced lower-than-anticipated manufacturing output during the ramp-up of production lines. This often occurs during the introduction of new products, the installation of new equipment or the implementation of new process technologies. As we bring additional lines or facilities into production, we may operate at less than intended capacity during the ramp-up period. In addition, the decreased demand in global solar power product market, including the demand for solar modules, may also cause us to operate at less than intended capacity. This would result in higher marginal production costs and lower output, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Demand for solar power products may be adversely affected by seasonality.

Demand for solar power products tends to be weaker during the winter months partly due to adverse weather conditions in certain regions, which complicate the installation of solar power systems, our operating results may fluctuate from period to period based on the seasonality of industry demand for solar power products. Our sales in the first quarter of any year may also be affected by the occurrence of the Chinese New Year holiday during which domestic industrial activity is normally lower than that at other times. Such fluctuations may result in the underutilization of our capacity and increase our average costs per unit. In addition, we may not be able to capture all of the available demand if our capacity is insufficient during the summer months. As a result, fluctuations in the demand for our products may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Unsatisfactory performance of or defects in our products may cause us to incur additional expenses and warranty costs, damage our reputation and cause our sales to decline.

Our products may contain defects that are not detected until after they are shipped or inspected by our customers.

Our silicon wafer sales contracts normally require our customers to conduct inspection before delivery. We may, from time to time, allow those of our silicon wafer customers with good credit to return our silicon wafers within a stipulated period, which normally ranges from 7 to 15 working days after delivery, if they find our silicon wafers do not meet the required specifications. Our standard solar cell sales contract requires our customer to notify us within seven days of delivery if such customer finds our solar cells do not meet the specifications stipulated in the sales contract. If our customer notifies us of such defect within the specified time period and provides relevant proof, we will replace those defective solar cells with qualified ones after our confirmation of such defects.

Our solar modules are typically sold with either a five-year or ten-year warranty for all defects and a 12-year and 25-year warranty against declines of more than 10.0% and 20.0%, respectively, from the initial minimum power generation capacity at the time of delivery. If a solar module is defective during the relevant warranty period, we will either repair or replace the solar module. As we continue to increase our sales to the major export markets, we may be exposed to increased warranty claims.

In May 2011, we engaged PowerGuard Specialty Insurance Services, or PowerGuard, a firm specialized in unique insurance and risk management solutions for the wind and solar energy industries, to provide insurance coverage for the product warranty services of our solar modules worldwide effective from May 1,

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2011. Since May 2011, we have renewed the insurance policy upon its expiration in May for each year for a period of one year. The policy offers back-to-back coverage through a maximum of ten-year limited product defects warranty, as well as a 12-year and 25-year linear warranty against declines of more than 10.0% and 20.0%, respectively, from the initial minimum power generation capacity at the time of delivery.

If we experience a significant increase in warranty claims, we may incur significant repair and replacement costs associated with such claims. In addition, product defects could cause significant damage to our market reputation and reduce our product sales and market share, and our failure to maintain the consistency and quality throughout our production process could result in substandard quality or performance of our products. If we deliver our products with defects, or if there is a perception that our products are of substandard quality, we may incur substantially increased costs associated with returns or replacements of our products, our credibility and market reputation could be harmed and our sales and market share may be materially and adversely affected.

Fluctuations in exchange rates could adversely affect our results of operations.

We derive a substantial portion of our sales from international customers and a significant portion of our total revenue have been denominated in foreign currencies, particularly, Euros and U.S. dollars. Our export sales represented 65.6%, 82.6%, 54.5% and 54.8% of our total revenue in 2010, 2011, 2012 and the nine months ended September 30, 2013, respectively. As a result, we may face significant risks resulting from currency exchange rate fluctuations, particularly, among Renminbi, Euros and U.S. dollars. Furthermore, we have outstanding debt obligations, and may continue to incur debts from time to time, denominated and repayable in foreign currencies. We incurred foreign-exchange losses of approximately RMB10.1 million, RMB139.0 million, RMB36.5 million and RMB32.0 million, in 2010, 2011, 2012 and September 30, 2013, respectively. We cannot predict the impact of future exchange rate fluctuations on our results of operations and may incur net foreign currency losses in the future.

Our consolidated financial statements are expressed in Renminbi. The functional currency of our principal operating subsidiaries, Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko, is also Renminbi. To the extent we hold assets denominated in Euros or U.S. dollars, any appreciation of Renminbi against the Euro or U.S. dollar could reduce the value of our Euro- or U.S. dollar-denominated consolidated assets. On the other hand, if we decide to convert our Renminbi amounts into Euros or U.S. dollars for business purposes, including foreign debt service, a decline in the value of Renminbi against the Euro or U.S. dollar would reduce the Euro or U.S. dollar equivalent amounts of the Renminbi we convert. In addition, a depreciation of Renminbi against the U.S. dollar could reduce the U.S. dollar equivalent amounts of our financial results and the dividends we may pay in the future, if any, all of which may have a material adverse effect on the price of our ADSs.

In July 2005, the PRC government changed its policy of pegging the value of the Renminbi to the U.S. dollar, and the Renminbi was permitted to fluctuate within a band against a basket of certain foreign currencies. As a result, the Renminbi appreciated more than 20% against the U.S. dollar over the following three years. However, the People’s Bank of China regularly intervenes in the foreign exchange market to limit fluctuations in Renminbi exchange rates and achieve policy goals. For almost two years after July 2008, the Renminbi traded within a very narrow range against the U.S. dollar, remaining within 1% of its July 2008 high. As a consequence, the Renminbi fluctuated significantly during that period against other freely traded currencies, in tandem with the U.S. dollar. In June 2010, the PRC government announced that it would increase the exchange rate flexibility of the Renminbi, though it did not specify how the increased flexibility would be implemented. In April 2012, the People’s Bank of China announced that it would expand the floating range of the trading price of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar from 0.5% to 1.0%, beginning on April 16, 2012. In 2012, the Renminbi appreciated 1.02% against the U.S. dollar. There remains significant international pressure on the PRC government to adopt a more flexible currency policy, which could result in a further and more significant appreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar. The Renminbi may appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the long term, depending on the fluctuation of the basket of currencies against which it is currently valued or it may be permitted to enter into a full float, which may also result in a significant appreciation or depreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar. Any currency exchange losses we recognize may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert Renminbi into foreign currency.

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Very limited hedging transactions are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. Although we have entered into a number of foreign-exchange forward contracts with local banks to manage our risks associated with foreign-exchange rates fluctuations, we cannot assure you that our hedging efforts will be effective. Our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert Renminbi into foreign currency. As a result, fluctuations in exchange rates may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Our limited operating history makes it difficult to evaluate our results of operations and prospects.

We have only been in existence since June 2006 and have limited operating history in the manufacturing and sales of our silicon wafer, solar cell and solar module products. We commenced processing recoverable silicon materials in June 2006, and manufacturing silicon ingots and silicon wafers in 2007 and 2008, respectively. We commenced producing solar cells in July 2009 following our acquisition of Zhejiang Jinko, which has manufactured solar cells since June 2007, and we commenced producing solar modules in August 2009. We commenced our solar power project development and solar system integration service business in late 2011.

Although our revenue experienced significant growth in the past, we cannot assure you that our revenue will increase at previous rates or at all, or that we will be able to continue to operate profitably in future periods. We also experienced net losses in each quarter from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the first quarter of 2013. Our limited operating history makes the prediction of future results of operations difficult, and therefore, past revenue growth experienced by us should not be taken as indicative of the rate of revenue growth, if any, that can be expected in the future. We believe that period to period comparisons of our operating results and our results for any period should not be relied upon as an indication of future performance.

Our operations are subject to natural disasters, adverse weather conditions, operating hazards, environmental incidents and labor disputes.

We may experience earthquakes, floods, mudslides, snowstorms, typhoon, power outages, labor disputes or similar events beyond our control that would affect our operations. Our manufacturing processes involve the use of hazardous equipment, such as furnaces, squaring machines and wire saws. We also use, store and generate volatile and otherwise dangerous chemicals and waste during our manufacturing processes, which are potentially destructive and dangerous if not properly handled or in the event of uncontrollable or catastrophic circumstances, including operating hazards, fires and explosions, natural disasters, adverse weather conditions and major equipment failures, for which we cannot obtain insurance at a reasonable cost or at all.

In addition, our silicon wafer and solar module production and storage facilities are located in close proximity to one another in the Shangrao Economic Development Zone in Jiangxi Province, and our solar cell production and storage facilities are located in close proximity to one another in Haining, Zhejiang Province. The occurrence of any natural disaster, unanticipated catastrophic event or unexpected accident in either of the two locations could result in production curtailments, shutdowns or periods of reduced production, which could significantly disrupt our business operations, cause us to incur additional costs and affect our ability to deliver our products to our customers as scheduled, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, such events could result in severe damage to property, personal injuries, fatalities, regulatory enforcement proceedings or in our being named as a defendant in lawsuits asserting claims for large amounts of damages, which in turn could lead to significant liabilities.

Our Haining facility suspended operation from September 17, 2011 to October 9, 2011 due to an environmental incident. See “— Compliance with environmentally safe production and construction regulations can be costly, while non-compliance with such regulations may result in adverse publicity and potentially significant monetary damages, fines and suspension of our business operations.” Occurrences of natural disasters, as well as accidents and incidents of adverse weather in or around Shangrao and Haining in the future may result in significant property damage, electricity shortages, disruption of our operations, work stoppages, civil unrest, personal injuries and, in severe cases, fatalities. Such incidents may result in damage to our reputation or cause us to lose all or a portion of our production capacity, and future revenue anticipated to be derived from the relevant facilities.

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As our founders collectively hold 47.0% of our outstanding ordinary shares, they have significant influence over our management and their interests may not be aligned with our interests or the interests of our other shareholders.

As of the date of this prospectus supplement, our founders, Xiande Li who is our chairman, Kangping Chen who is our chief executive officer, and Xianhua Li who is our vice president, beneficially owned approximately 18.5%, 11.5% and 6.0%, respectively, of our outstanding ordinary shares for a total of 36.0% beneficially owned. In addition, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, an aggregate of approximately 38.4% of our outstanding ordinary shares was held by our founders. If the founders act collectively, they will have a substantial influence over our business, including decisions regarding mergers, consolidations and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, election of directors, dividend policy and other significant corporate actions. They may take actions that are not in the best interest of our company or our securities holders. For example, this concentration of ownership may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of our company, which could deprive our shareholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their shares as part of a sale of our company and might reduce the price of our ADSs. On the other hand, if the founders are in favor of any of these actions, these actions may be taken even if they are opposed by a majority of our other shareholders, including you and those who invest in ADSs. In addition, under our current articles of association, the quorum required for the general meeting of our shareholders is two shareholders entitled to vote and present in person or by proxy or, if the shareholder is a corporation, by its duly authorized representative representing not less than one-third in nominal value of our total issued voting shares. As such, a shareholders resolution may be passed at our shareholders meetings with the presence of our founders only and without the presence of any of our other shareholders, which may not represent the interests of our other shareholders, including holders of ADSs.

We have limited insurance coverage and may incur losses resulting from product liability claims, business interruption or natural disasters.

We are exposed to risks associated with product liability claims in the event that the use of our products results in property damage or personal injury. Since our products are ultimately incorporated into electricity generating systems, it is possible that users could be injured or killed by devices that use our products, whether as a result of product malfunctions, defects, improper installations or other causes. Due to our limited operating history, we are unable to predict whether product liability claims will be brought against us in the future or to predict the impact of any resulting adverse publicity on our business. The successful assertion of product liability claims against us could result in potentially significant monetary damages and require us to make significant payments. We carry limited product liability insurance and may not have adequate resources to satisfy a judgment in the event of a successful claim against us. In addition, we do not carry any business interruption insurance. As the insurance industry in China is still in its early stage of development, even if we decide to take out business interruption coverage, such insurance available in China offers limited coverage compared with that offered in many other countries. Any business interruption or natural disaster could result in substantial losses and diversion of our resources and materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The grant of employee share options and other share-based compensation could adversely affect our net income.

We adopted our 2009 Long Term Incentive Plan on July 10, 2009, which was subsequently amended and restated. As of the date of prospectus supplement, share options with respect to 9,328,182 ordinary shares have been granted to our directors, officers and employees pursuant to our 2009 Long Term Incentive Plan, and there are 7,070,802 ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding options granted under the plan. U.S. GAAP requires us to recognize share-based compensation as compensation expense in the consolidated statement of operations based on the fair value of equity awards on the date of the grant, with the compensation expense recognized over the period in which the recipient is required to provide service in exchange for the equity award. If we grant more share options to attract and retain key personnel, the expenses associated with share-based compensation may adversely affect our net income. However, if we do not grant share options or reduce the number of share options that we grant, we may not be able to attract and retain key personnel.

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Our lack of sufficient patent protection in and outside of China may undermine our competitive position and subject us to intellectual property disputes with third parties, both of which may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We have developed various production process related know-how and technologies in the production of our products. Such know-how and technologies play a critical role in our quality assurance and cost reduction. In addition, we have implemented a number of research and development programs with a view to developing techniques and processes that will improve production efficiency and product quality. Our intellectual property and proprietary rights from our research and development programs will be crucial in maintaining our competitive edge in the solar power industry. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we had 87 patents and 89 pending patent applications in China. We plan to continue to seek to protect our intellectual property and proprietary knowledge by applying for patents for them. However, we cannot assure you that we will be successful in obtaining patents in China in a timely manner or at all. Moreover, even if we are successful, China currently affords less protection to a company’s intellectual property than some other countries, including the United States. We also use contractual arrangements with employees and trade secret protections to protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights. Nevertheless, contractual arrangements afford only limited protection and the actions we may take to protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights may not be adequate.

In addition, others may obtain knowledge of our know-how and technologies through independent development. Our failure to protect our production process, related know-how and technologies, our intellectual property and proprietary rights or any combination of the above may undermine our competitive position. Third parties may infringe or misappropriate our proprietary technologies or other intellectual property and proprietary rights. Policing unauthorized use of proprietary technology can be difficult and expensive. Litigation, which can be costly and divert management attention and other resources away from our business, may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights, protect our trade secrets or determine the validity and scope of our proprietary rights. We cannot assure you that the outcome of such potential litigation will be in our favor. An adverse determination in any such litigation will impair our intellectual property and proprietary rights and may harm our business, prospects and reputation.

We may be exposed to intellectual property infringement or misappropriation claims by third parties, which, if determined adversely to us, could cause us to pay significant damage awards.

Our success depends on our ability to use and develop our technology and know-how, and to manufacture and sell our recovered silicon materials, silicon ingots, silicon wafers, solar cells and solar modules, develop solar projects or otherwise operate our business in the solar industry without infringing the intellectual property or other rights of third parties. We may be subject to litigation involving claims of patent infringement or violation of intellectual property rights of third parties. The validity and scope of claims relating to solar power technology patents involve complex scientific, legal and factual questions and analyses and, therefore, may be highly uncertain. The defense and prosecution of intellectual property suits, patent opposition proceedings, trademark disputes and related legal and administrative proceedings can be both costly and time consuming and may significantly divert our resources and the attention of our technical and management personnel. An adverse ruling in any such litigation or proceedings could subject us to significant liability to third parties, require us to seek licenses from third parties, to pay ongoing royalties, or to redesign our products or subject us to injunctions prohibiting the manufacture and sale of our products or the use of our technologies. Protracted litigation could also result in our customers or potential customers deferring or limiting their purchase or use of our products until resolution of such litigation.

Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our executive officers and key technical personnel, as well as our ability to maintain a skilled labor force. Our business may be materially and adversely affected if we lose their services.

Our success depends on the continued services of our executive officers and key personnel, in particular our founders, Mr. Xiande Li, Mr. Kangping Chen and Mr. Xianhua Li. We do not maintain key-man life insurance on any of our executive officers and key personnel. If one or more of our executive officers and key personnel are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, we may not be able to readily replace them, if at all. As a result, our business may be severely disrupted and we may have to incur additional

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expenses in order to recruit and retain new personnel. In addition, if any of our executives joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose some of our customers. Each of our executive officers and key personnel has entered into an employment agreement with us that contains confidentiality and non-competition provisions. However, if any dispute arises between our executive officers or key personnel and us, we cannot assure you, in light of uncertainties associated with the PRC legal system, that these agreements could be enforced in China where most of our executive officers and key personnel reside and hold most of their assets. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could have a material adverse effect on us.”

Furthermore, recruiting and retaining capable personnel, particularly experienced engineers and technicians familiar with our products and manufacturing processes, is vital to maintain the quality of our products and improve our production methods. There is substantial competition for qualified technical personnel, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to attract or retain qualified technical personnel. If we are unable to attract and retain qualified employees, key technical personnel and our executive officers, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

Compliance with environmentally safe production and construction regulations can be costly, while non-compliance with such regulations may result in adverse publicity and potentially significant monetary damages, fines and suspension of our business operations.

We are required to comply with all PRC national and local environmental protection regulations. Regulations on emission trading and pollution permits in Zhejiang Province allow entities to increase their annual pollution discharge limit by purchasing emissions trading credits. Entities that purchase emission credits can increase their annual discharge limit by registering the credits with the relevant environmental authorities and amending their pollution permits or obtaining new ones. We have entered into several emissions trading contracts to purchase credits to increase our annual discharge limit and registered all credits as required under a local regulation that became effective on October 9, 2010. However, as our business grows, we may increase our discharge level in the future and we cannot guarantee you that we will continue to be below our annual discharge limit. The penalties for exceeding the annual discharge limit may include corrective orders, fines imposed by the local environmental authority of up to RMB50,000 or, in extreme circumstances, revocation of our pollution permit. Some of our PRC subsidiaries need to obtain and maintain pollution discharge permits, which are subject to renewal or extension on an annual basis or within a longer period. We cannot assure to you that we are or will be able to renew or extend these permits in a timely manner or at all.

We use, store and generate volatile and otherwise dangerous chemicals and wastes during our manufacturing processes, and are subject to a variety of government regulations related to the use, storage and disposal of such hazardous chemicals and waste. In accordance with the requirements of the revised Regulation on the Safety Management of Hazardous Chemicals, which became effective on December 1, 2011, we are required to engage State-qualified institutions to conduct the safety evaluation on our storage instruments related to our use of hazardous chemicals and file the safety evaluation report with the competent safety supervision and administration authorities every three years. In compliance with Jiaxing City environmental authority’s requests, we commenced efforts to meet their targets for hazardous chemical and wastes in May 2012. Environmental authorities of Haining City and Jiaxing City evaluated our efforts and confirmed that we satisfied their targets in September 2012. Moreover, we also need to timely file a report with the competent safety supervision and administration authorities and public security agencies concerning the actual storage situation of our hyper-toxic chemicals and other hazardous chemicals that constitute major of hazard sources. We have not conducted the safety evaluation or filed safety evaluation reports with respect to certain of our storage instruments in compliance with the revised Regulation on the Safety Management of Hazardous Chemicals and we cannot assure you that we will be able to file the safety evaluation reports on time. Failure to make such filing on time may subject us to an order to rectify such conduct within a prescribed time period, fines of up to RMB100,000 or a revocation of our qualification certification and business license.

Moreover, we are required to obtain construction permits before commencing constructing production facilities. We are also required to obtain the approvals from PRC environmental protection authorities before commencing commercial operations of our manufacturing facilities. We commenced construction of a portion

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of our solar cell and solar module production facilities prior to obtaining the construction permits and commenced operations of certain of our production facilities prior to obtaining the environmental approvals for commencing commercial operation and completing the required safety evaluation procedure. Although we have subsequently obtained all required environmental approvals covering all of our existing production capacity except a portion of our solar cell and solar module production capacity, we cannot assure you that we will not be penalized by the relevant government authorities for any prior non-compliance with the PRC environmental protection, safe production and construction regulations.

In late August 2011, our Haining facility experienced a suspected leakage of fluoride into a nearby small water channel due to extreme and unforeseen weather conditions. On September 15, 2011, residents of Hongxiao Village in proximity to the Haining facility gathered to protest the discharge. The Haining facility suspended production on September 17, 2011. We also took steps recommended by an environmental engineering firms licensed by the PRC government (“Licensed Engineers”). On September 28, 2011, a committee of experts (the “Experts Committee”) established by the Haining government approved a set of recommendations developed by the Licensed Engineers with our assistance and the Haining government to be implemented by us. On October 6, 2011, the Experts Committee, the Environmental Bureau of the Haining government and representatives of Hongxiao Village reviewed the steps taken by us based on the recommendations of the Experts Committee and provided their comments to JinkoSolar’s management. On October 9, 2011, the Experts Committee notified us that the Experts Committee was satisfied with the steps taken by us and we resumed production at the Haining facility. In 2012, we carried out a series of environmental protection efforts intended to ensure our compliance with relevant standards and requirements. In January 2013, Haining City environmental authority issued the “Environmental Management Compliance Certificate for 2012” to us, confirming our compliance with environmental requirements.

Although we will try to take measures to prevent similar incidents from occurring again in the future, we cannot assure you that our operations will not be disrupted by similar or other environmental incidents. In addition, the PRC government may issue more stringent environmental protection, safe production and construction regulations in the future and the costs of compliance with new regulations could be substantial. If we fail to comply with the future environmentally safe production and construction laws and regulations, we may be required to pay fines, suspend construction or production, or cease operations. Moreover, any failure by us to control the use of, or to adequately restrict the discharge of, dangerous substances could subject us to potentially significant monetary damages and fines or the suspension of our business operations.

Risks Related to Doing Business in China

We may fail to comply with laws and regulations regarding the development, construction and operation of solar projects and PV production projects in China.

The development, construction and operation of solar projects and PV production projects are highly regulated activities. Our operations in China are governed by different laws and regulations, including national and local regulations relating to building codes, safety, and environmental protection, utility interconnection and metering and related matters.

Historically, the establishment of a solar power plant is subject to the approval of the NDRC or its local branches, pursuant to the Catalog of Investment Projects Authorized by the Government (2004) promulgated by the NDRC.

The website of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, or MIIT, indicates that pursuant to the Polysilicon Industry Access Standards, promulgated jointly by the MIIT, the NDRC and the Ministry of Environment Protection on December 31, 2010, the minimum capital ratio to build or expand a polysilicon project should be no less than 30%. Regarding capacity, newly built solar-grade and semiconductor-grade polysilicon plants must be able to produce more than 3,000 tons per year and 1,000 tons per year, respectively. The standards also include requirements on land use, energy costs, air and water waste controls.

Pursuant to the Interim Measures for the Administration of Distributed Electricity Generation, promulgated by the NDRC on July 18, 2013, the previous requirement to obtain a permit for distributed generation has been waived. Now, the local state grid companies are responsible for connecting distributed generation facilities to the state grid.

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Pursuant to the Interim Measures for the Administration of PV Power Generation Projects, promulgated by the National Energy Commission on August 29, 2013, PV power generation projects are subject to filings with the provincial NDRC. Such filing is subject to the national development plan for solar power generation, the regional scale index and implementation plan of the year as promulgated by the National Energy Commission and the condition to get connected to grids.

Pursuant to the Interim Measures for the Administration of Distributed PV Power Generation Projects, or the Distributed PV Interim Measures, promulgated by the National Energy Commission on November 18, 2013, distributed PV power generation projects are subject to filings with the provincial NDRC. Such filing is subject to State Council’s rules for administration of investment projects and the regional scale index and implementation plan of the year as promulgated by the National Energy Commission. The distributed PV Interim Measures also provide that the filing procedures shall be simplified and the power generation permit and permits in relation to land planning, environmental impact review, energy saving evaluation and other supporting documents could be waived. Detailed requirements of the filing are also subject to local regulations, and it is yet to evaluate the effects of the Distributed PV Interim Measures on our business.

Pursuant to the Conditions of Photovoltaic Production Industry, or the Photovoltaic Production Rule, promulgated by the MIIT on September 16, 2013 and effective October 16, 2013, the minimum proportion of capital funds contributed by the producer for newly built, renovation and expansion PV production projects shall be 20%. The Photovoltaic Production Rule also provides, among other matters, requirements in relation to the production scale, cell efficiency, energy consumption and operational life span of various PV products.

Our failure to obtain the required approvals, permits or licenses or to comply with the conditions associated therewith could result in fines, sanctions, suspension, revocation or non-renewal of approvals, permits or licenses, or even criminal penalties, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Any new government regulations pertaining to solar projects may result in significant additional expenses to the development, construction and operation of solar projects and, as a result, could cause a significant reduction in demand for our solar projects and services.

We cannot assure you that we will be able to promptly and adequately respond to changes of laws and regulations, or that our employees and contractors will act in accordance with our internal policies and procedures. Failure to comply with laws and regulations where we develop, construct and operate solar projects may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our auditor, like other independent registered public accounting firms operating in China, is not permitted to be subject to inspection by Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, and as such, investors may be deprived of the benefits of such inspection.

Our independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report for our annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2012, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), or the PCAOB, is required by the laws of the United States to undergo regular inspections by the PCAOB to assess its compliance with the laws of the United States and professional standards. Because our auditor is located in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the PRC authorities, our auditor, like other independent registered public accounting firms operating in China, is currently not inspected by the PCAOB. On May 24, 2013, the PCAOB announced that it had entered into a memorandum of understanding on enforcement cooperation with the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, and the MOF that establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations in the United States and China. However, direct PCAOB inspections of independent registered accounting firms in China are still not permitted by Chinese authorities.

Inspections of other firms that the PCAOB has conducted outside of China have identified deficiencies in those firms’ audit procedures and quality control procedures, which may be addressed as part of the inspection process to improve future audit quality. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of independent registered public accounting firms operating in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our auditor’s audit procedures or quality control procedures. As a result, investors may be deprived of the benefits of PCAOB inspections.

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Proceedings instituted by the SEC against five PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, could result in financial statements being determined to not be in compliance with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

In December 2012, the SEC instituted proceedings under Rule 102(e)(1)(iii) of the SEC’s Rules of Practice against five PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, alleging that these firms had violated U.S. securities laws and the SEC’s rules and regulations thereunder by failing to provide to the SEC the firms’ work papers related to their audits of certain PRC-based companies that are publicly traded in the United States. The order instituting these proceedings requires the administrative law judge presiding over the proceedings to issue an initial decision no later than 300 days from the date of service of the order. Rule 102(e)(1)(iii) grants to the SEC the authority to deny to any person, temporarily or permanently, the ability to practice before the SEC who is found by the SEC, after notice and opportunity for a hearing, to have willfully violated any such laws or rules and regulations. While we cannot predict the outcome of the SEC’s proceedings, if our independent registered public accounting firm were denied, temporarily or permanently, the ability to practice before the SEC, and we are unable to find timely another registered public accounting firm which can audit and issue a report on our financial statements, our financial statements could be determined to not be in compliance with the requirements for financial statements of public companies with a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act. Such a determination could ultimately lead to the delisting of our ADSs from the NYSE, which event would effectively terminate the trading market for our ADSs in the United States. Such a determination could also lead to the SEC’s revocation of the registration of our ordinary shares or ADSs pursuant to Section 12(j) of the Exchange Act, in which event broker-dealers thereafter would be prohibited from effecting transactions in, or inducing the purchase or sale of, our ordinary shares or ADSs in the United States.

The approval of the PRC Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM, for or in connection with our corporate restructuring in 2007 and 2008 may be subject to revocation, which will have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and trading price of our ADSs.

On August 8, 2006, six PRC governmental and regulatory agencies, including the Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China, or the MOFCOM and the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, promulgated a rule entitled “Provisions Regarding Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors,” or Circular 10, which became effective on September 8, 2006 and was amended in June 2009. Article 11 of Circular 10 requires PRC domestic enterprises or domestic natural persons to obtain the prior approval of MOFCOM when an offshore company established or controlled by them proposes to merge with or acquire a PRC domestic company with which such enterprises or persons have a connected relationship.

We undertook a restructuring in 2007, or the 2007 Restructuring, and our founders and JinkoSolar Technology Limited, previously Paker Technology Limited, or JinkoSolar Technology, obtained the approval of Jiangxi MOFCOM, for the acquisition of certain equity interest in Jiangxi Desun and the pledge by our founders of their equity interest in Jiangxi Desun to Jinko Solar Technology, or the 2007 acquisition and pledge. However, because our founders are PRC natural persons and they controlled both JinkoSolar Technology and Jiangxi Desun, the 2007 acquisition and pledge would be subject to Article 11 of Circular 10 and therefore subject to approval by MOFCOM at the central government level. To remedy this past non-compliance, we undertook another corporate restructuring in 2008, or the 2008 Restructuring, under which the share pledge was terminated on July 28, 2008 and JinkoSolar Technology transferred all of its equity interest in Jiangxi Desun to Long Faith Creation Limited, or Long Faith, an unrelated Hong Kong company, on July 31, 2008. In addition, on November 11, 2008, we received written confirmation from Jiangxi MOFCOM in its reply to our inquiry that there had been no modification to the former approvals for the 2007 acquisition and pledge and JinkoSolar Technology’s transfer of its equity interest in Jiangxi Desun to Long Faith, and we might continue to rely on those approvals for further transactions. Nevertheless, we cannot assure you that MOFCOM will not revoke such approval and subject us to regulatory actions, penalties or other sanctions because of such past non-compliance. If the approval of Jiangxi MOFCOM for the 2007 acquisition and pledge were revoked and we were not able to obtain MOFCOM’s retrospective approval for the 2007 acquisition and pledge, Jiangxi Desun may be required to return the tax benefits to which only a foreign-invested enterprise was entitled and which were recognized by us during the period from April 10,

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2007 to December 31, 2007, and the profit distribution to JinkoSolar Technology in December 2008 may be required to be unwound. Under an indemnification letter issued by our founders to us, our founders have agreed to indemnify us for any monetary losses we may incur as a result of any violation of Circular 10 in connection with the restructuring we undertook in 2007. We cannot assure you, however, that this indemnification letter will be enforceable under the PRC law, our founders will have sufficient resources to fully indemnify us for such losses, or that we will not otherwise suffer damages to our business and reputation as a result of any sanctions for such non-compliance.

Meanwhile, given the uncertainty with respect to what constitutes a merger with or acquisition of PRC domestic enterprise and what constitutes circumvention of its approval requirements under Circular 10, we cannot assure you that the 2008 Restructuring is in all respects compliance with Circular 10. If MOFCOM subsequently determines that its approval of the 2008 Restructuring was required, we may face regulatory actions or other sanctions by MOFCOM or other PRC regulatory agencies. Such actions may include compelling us to terminate the contracts between Jiangxi Desun and us, the limitation of our operating privileges in China, the imposition of fines and penalties on our operations in China, restrictions or prohibition on the payment or remittance of dividends by Jiangxi Jinko or others that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and prospects, as well as the trading price of our ADSs.

Adverse changes in political and economic policies of the PRC government could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of China, which could reduce the demand for our products and materially and adversely affect our competitive position.

Our business is based in China and a portion of our sales are made in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects are affected significantly by economic, political and legal developments in China. The PRC economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including:

the level of government involvement;
the level of development;
the growth rate;
the control of foreign exchange; and
the allocation of resources.

While the PRC economy has grown significantly in the past 30 years, the growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. The PRC government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures benefit the overall PRC economy, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations that are applicable to us.

The PRC economy has been transitioning from a planned economy to a more market-oriented economy. Although in recent years the PRC government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets and the establishment of sound corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of the productive assets in China is still owned by the PRC government. The continued control of these assets and other aspects of the national economy by the PRC government could materially and adversely affect our business. The PRC government also exercises significant control over China’s economic growth through allocating resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies. We cannot predict whether changes in China’s political, economic and social conditions, laws, regulations and policies will have any material adverse effect on our current or future business, financial conditions and results of operations.

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Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could have a material adverse effect on us.

We are incorporated in Cayman Islands and are subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China and, in particular, laws applicable to wholly foreign owned companies. The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions have limited precedential value. Since 1979, PRC legislation and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involve uncertainties, which may limit legal protections available to us. For example, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce the legal protection that we enjoy either by law or contract. However, since PRC administrative authorities and courts have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult than in more developed legal systems to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy. These uncertainties may impede our ability to enforce the contracts we have entered into with our business partners, clients and suppliers. In addition, such uncertainties, including the inability to enforce our contracts, could materially adversely affect our business and operations. Furthermore, intellectual property rights and confidentiality protections in China may not be as effective as in the United States or other countries. Accordingly, we cannot predict the effect of future developments in the PRC legal system, including the promulgation of new laws, changes to existing laws or the interpretation or enforcement thereof, or the preemption of national laws by local regulations. These uncertainties could limit the legal protections available to us and other foreign investors, including you. In addition, any litigation in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

PRC regulations may subject our future mergers and acquisitions activity to national security review.

In February 2011, the State Council promulgated Circular 6, a notice on the establishment of a security review system for mergers and acquisitions of domestic enterprises by foreign investors. Circular 6 became effective on March 3, 2011. To implement Circular 6, MOFCOM promulgated the MOFCOM Security Review Rules on August 25, 2011, which became effective on September 1, 2011. According to Circular 6 and the MOFCOM Security Review Rules, national security review is required to be undertaken to complete mergers and acquisitions (i) by foreign investors of enterprises relating to national defense and (ii) through which foreign investors may acquire de facto control of a domestic enterprise that could raise national security concerns. When determining whether to subject a specific merger or acquisition to national security review, the MOFCOM will look at the substance and actual impact of the transaction. Bypassing national security review by structuring transactions through proxies, trusts, indirect investments, leases, loans, control through contractual arrangements or offshore transactions by foreign investors is prohibited.

In addition, even if a merger or acquisition by foreign investors that was not submitted for national security review, or was determined to have no impact on national security after such review, does not mean that it will be free of such review. A change in conditions (such as a modification of the merger or acquisition, change of business activities, or amendments to relevant documents or agreements) that results in the merger or acquisition triggering national security review (i.e., involving an enterprise relating to national defense, or the foreign investor acquiring de facto control over a domestic enterprise raising national security concerns), then the foreign investor to the merger or acquisition will be required to apply for national security review with the MOFCOM.

Currently, there are no public provisions or official interpretations specifically providing that our current businesses fall within the scope of national security review and there is no requirement that foreign investors to those merger and acquisition transactions completed prior to the promulgation of Circular 6 take initiatives to submit such transactions to MOFCOM for national security review. However, as the MOFCOM Security Review Rules and Circular 6 are relatively new and there is no clear statutory interpretation on their implementation, there is no assurance that the relevant PRC regulatory authorities will have the same view as us when applying them. If our future merger and acquisition transactions are subject to the national security review, the MOFCOM Security Review Rules and Circular 6 may further complicate the PRC governmental formalities for approving merger and acquisition deals in which we may be involved in the future, and therefore increase the uncertainty of our future business model.

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PRC regulations relating to overseas investment by PRC residents may restrict our overseas and cross-border investment activities and adversely affect the implementation of our strategy as well as our business and prospects.

The State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, issued a public notice in October 2005, or the SAFE Circular 75, and subsequently issued the operating rules on the SAFE Circular 75 in November 2012, or SAFE Circular 59, requiring PRC residents, including both legal persons and natural persons, to register with the competent local SAFE branch before establishing or controlling any company outside China, referred to as an “offshore special purpose company”, for the purpose of acquiring any assets of or equity interest in PRC companies and raising funds from overseas. In addition, any PRC resident that is the shareholder of an offshore special purpose company is required to amend its SAFE registration with the local SAFE branch with respect to that offshore special purpose company in connection with any increase or decrease of capital, transfer of shares, merger, division, equity investment or creation of any security interest over any asset located in China. If any PRC shareholder of an offshore special purpose company fails to make the required SAFE registration and amendment, the PRC subsidiaries of that offshore special purpose company may be prohibited from distributing their profits and the proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the offshore special purpose company. Moreover, failure to comply with the SAFE registration and amendment requirements described above could result in liability under PRC laws for evasion of applicable foreign-exchange restrictions. We believe that all of our beneficial owners who are PRC citizens or residents have completed their required registrations with SAFE in accordance with the SAFE Circular 75 prior to the completion of our initial public offering. However, after the initial public offering, we may not at all times be fully aware or informed of the identities of all of our beneficial owners who are PRC citizens or residents, and we may have little control over either our present or prospective direct or indirect PRC resident beneficial owners or the outcome of such registration procedures. We cannot assure you that the SAFE registrations of our present beneficial owners or future beneficial owners who are PRC citizens or residents have been or will be amended to reflect, among others, the shareholding information or equity investment as required by the SAFE Circular 75 and SAFE Circular 59 at all times. The failure of these beneficial owners to amend their SAFE registrations in a timely manner pursuant to the SAFE Circular 75 and SAFE Circular 59 or the failure of future beneficial owners of our company who are PRC residents to comply with the registration procedures set forth in the SAFE Circular 75 and SAFE Circular 59 may subject such beneficial owners and our PRC subsidiaries to fines and legal sanctions and may also result in restrictions on our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute profits to us or our ability to inject capital into our PRC subsidiaries or otherwise materially and adversely affect our business.

On December 25, 2006, the People’s Bank of China promulgated the Measures for Administration of Individual Foreign Exchange, and on January 5, 2007, the SAFE promulgated relevant Implementation Rules. On February 15, 2012, the SAFE promulgated the Notice on Various Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Equity Incentive Plans of Overseas Listed Companies, or the Stock Option Notice. The Stock Option Notice terminated the Operating Procedures of Foreign Exchange Administration of PRC Individuals’ Participation in Employee Stock Holding Plans or Stock Option Plans of Overseas Listed Companies issued by the SAFE on March 28, 2007. According to the Stock Option Notice, PRC citizens who are granted shares or share options by a company listed on an overseas stock market according to its employee stock holding plan or stock incentive plan are required to register with the SAFE or its local counterparts by following certain procedures.

We and our employees who are PRC citizens and individual beneficiary owners, or have been granted restricted shares or share options, are subject to the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules and its relevant implementation regulations. The failure of our PRC individual beneficiary owners and the restricted holders to complete their SAFE registrations pursuant to the SAFE’s requirement or the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules may subject these PRC citizens to fines and legal sanctions. It may also limit our ability to contribute additional capital into our PRC subsidiaries, and limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute dividends to us, or otherwise materially adversely affect our business.

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Our China-sourced income is subject to PRC withholding tax under the Corporate Income Tax Law of the PRC, and we may be subject to PRC corporate income tax at the rate of 25% when more detailed rules or precedents are promulgated.

We are a Cayman Islands holding company with substantially all of our operations conducted through our operating subsidiaries in China. Under the Corporate Income Tax Law, or the CIT Law, of the PRC and the Regulation on the Implementation CIT Law, or the Implementation Rules of the CIT Law, both of which became effective on January 1, 2008, China-sourced passive income of non-PRC tax resident enterprises, such as dividends paid by a PRC subsidiary to its overseas parent, is generally subject to a 10% withholding tax. Under an arrangement between China and Hong Kong, such dividend withholding tax rate is reduced to 5% if the beneficial owner of the dividends is a Hong Kong tax resident enterprise which directly owns at least 25% of the PRC company distributing the dividends and has owned such equity for at least 12 consecutive months before receiving such dividends. As JinkoSolar Technology is a Hong Kong company and has owned 100% of the equity interest in Jiangxi Jinko and 25% of the equity interest in Zhejiang Jinko directly for more than 12 consecutive months to date, any dividends paid by Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko to JinkoSolar Technology will be entitled to a withholding tax at the reduced rate of 5% after obtaining approval from the competent PRC tax authority, provided that JinkoSolar Technology is deemed the beneficial owner of such dividends and that JinkoSolar Technology is not deemed to be a PRC tax resident enterprise as described below. However, according to the Circular of the State Administration of Taxation on How to Understand and Identify “Beneficial Owner” under Tax Treaties, effective on October 27, 2009, an applicant for treaty benefits, including benefits under the arrangement between China and Hong Kong on dividend withholding tax, that does not carry out substantial business activities or is an agent or a conduit company may not be deemed as a “beneficial owner” of the PRC subsidiary and therefore, may not enjoy such treaty benefits. If JinkoSolar Technology is determined to be ineligible for such treaty benefits, any dividends paid by Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko to JinkoSolar Technology will be subject to the PRC withholding tax at a 10% rate.

The CIT Law, however, also provides that enterprises established outside China whose “de facto management bodies” are located in China are considered “tax resident enterprises” and will generally be subject to the uniform 25% corporate income tax rate as to their global income. Under the Implementation Rules of the CIT Law, “de facto management bodies” is defined as the bodies that have, in substance, overall management control over such aspects as the production and business, personnel, accounts and properties of an enterprise. On April 22, 2009, the State Administration of Taxation, or the SAT, promulgated the Notice Regarding the Determination of Chinese-Controlled Offshore Incorporated Enterprises as PRC Tax Resident Enterprises on the Basis of De Facto Management Bodies, or SAT Circular 82. SAT Circular 82 provides certain criteria for determining whether the “de facto management body” of an offshore-incorporated enterprise controlled by PRC enterprises is located in China. On July 27, 2011, the SAT issued Administrative Measures of Enterprise Income Tax of Chinese-controlled Offshore Incorporated Resident Enterprises (Trial), or Bulletin 45, which became effective on September 1, 2011, to provide further guidance on the implementation of SAT Circular 82. Bulletin 45 clarifies certain issues relating to the determination of PRC tax resident enterprise status, post-determination administration and the authorities responsible for determining offshore-incorporated PRC tax resident enterprise status. Bulletin 45 specifies that when provided with a copy of a Chinese tax resident determination certificate issued by the competent tax authorities from an offshore-incorporated PRC tax resident enterprise, the payer should not withhold 10% income tax when paying Chinese-sourced dividends, interest and royalties to the offshore incorporated PRC tax resident enterprise. However, as this circular only applies to enterprises incorporated under laws of foreign jurisdictions that are controlled by PRC enterprises or groups of PRC enterprises, it remains unclear how the tax authorities will determine the location of “de facto management bodies” for overseas incorporated enterprises that are controlled by individual PRC residents such as our company and JinkoSolar Technology. Therefore, although a substantial majority of the members of our management team as well as the management team of JinkoSolar Technology are located in China, it remains unclear whether the PRC tax authorities would require or permit our company or JinkoSolar Technology to be recognized as PRC tax resident enterprises. If our company and JinkoSolar Technology are considered PRC tax resident enterprises for PRC corporate income tax purposes, any dividends distributed from Jiangxi Jinko and Zhejiang Jinko to

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JinkoSolar Technology and ultimately to our company could be exempt from the PRC withholding tax; however, our company and JinkoSolar Technology will be subject to the uniform 25% corporate income tax rate as to our global income.

Dividends payable by us to our foreign investors and gains on the sale of our shares or ADSs may become subject to PRC corporate income tax liabilities.

The Implementation Rules of the CIT Law provide that (i) if the enterprise that distributes dividends is domiciled in China, or (ii) if gains are realized from transferring equity interests of enterprises domiciled in China, then such dividends or capital gains are treated as China-sourced income. The CIT Law and the related Implementation Rules of the CIT Law have been in effect for over six years. However, currently, there are still no detailed rules or precedents governing the procedures and specific criteria for determining “domicile,” which are applicable to our company or JinkoSolar Technology. As such, it is not clear how “domicile” will be interpreted under the CIT Law. It may be interpreted as the jurisdiction where the enterprise is incorporated or where the enterprise is a tax resident. Therefore, if our company and JinkoSolar Technology are considered PRC tax resident enterprises for tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders or ADS holders, as well as any gains realized by such shareholders or ADSs holders from the transfer of our shares or ADSs, may be viewed as China-sourced income and, as a consequence, be subject to PRC corporate income tax at 10% or a lower treaty rate.

If the dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders or ADS holders or gains realized by such shareholders or ADS holders from the transfer of our shares or ADSs are subject to PRC corporate income tax, we would be required to withhold taxes on such dividends. In such case, the value of your investment in our shares or ADSs may be materially and adversely affected.

Our ability to make distributions and other payments to our shareholders depends to a significant extent upon the distribution of earnings and other payments made by our subsidiaries in the PRC.

We conduct substantially all of our operations through our operating subsidiaries in China. Our ability to make distributions or other payments to our shareholders depends on payments from these operating subsidiaries in China, whose ability to make such payments is subject to PRC regulations. Regulations in the PRC currently permit payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits as determined in accordance with accounting standards and regulations in China. According to the relevant PRC laws and regulations applicable to our operating subsidiaries in China and their respective articles of association, these subsidiaries are each required to set aside at least 10% of their after-tax profits based on PRC accounting standards each year as general reserves until the accumulative amount of these reserves reaches 50% of their registered capital. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends. As of December 31, 2012, these general reserves amounted to RMB179.0 million, accounting for 5.3% of the total registered capital of all of our operating subsidiaries in China. In addition, under the CIT Law and its Implementation Rules, which became effective January 1, 2008, dividends from our operating subsidiaries in China to us are subject to withholding tax to the extent that we are considered a non-PRC tax resident enterprise under the CIT Law. See “— “Our China-sourced income is subject to PRC withholding tax under the Corporate Income Tax Law of the PRC, and we may be subject to PRC corporate income tax at the rate of 25% when more detailed rules or precedents are promulgated.” Furthermore, if our operating subsidiaries in China incur debt on their own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to us.

Restrictions on currency exchange may limit our ability to receive and use our revenue effectively.

Certain portions of our revenue and expenses are denominated in Renminbi. If our revenue denominated in Renminbi increases or expenses denominated in Renminbi decrease in the future, we may need to convert a portion of our revenue into other currencies to meet our foreign currency obligations, including, among others, payment of dividends declared, if any, in respect of our ADSs. Under China’s existing foreign exchange regulations, foreign currency under current account transactions, such as dividend payments and trade-related transactions are generally convertible. Accordingly, our operating subsidiaries in China are able to pay dividends in foreign currencies without prior approval from the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or the SAFE, by complying with certain procedural requirements. However, the PRC government could take further measures in the future to restrict access to foreign currencies for current account transactions.

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Foreign exchange transactions by our operating subsidiaries in China under capital accounts continue to be subject to significant foreign exchange controls and require the approval of, or registration with, PRC governmental authorities. In particular, if one of our operating subsidiaries in China borrows foreign currency loans from us or other foreign lenders, these loans must be registered with the SAFE.

If we finance our subsidiaries in China by means of additional capital contributions, these capital contributions must be approved by certain government authorities, including the Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM or its local counterparts. On August 29, 2008, the SAFE promulgated Circular 142, a notice regulating the conversion by a foreign-invested company of foreign currency into Renminbi by restricting how the converted Renminbi may be used. The notice requires that Renminbi converted from the foreign currency-denominated capital of a foreign-invested company may only be used for purposes within the business scope approved by the applicable governmental authority and may not be used for equity investments in the PRC unless otherwise provided by laws and regulations. In addition, the SAFE strengthened its oversight of the flow and use of Renminbi funds converted from the foreign currency denominated capital of a foreign-invested company. The use of such Renminbi may not be changed without approval from the SAFE, and may not be used to repay Renminbi loans if the proceeds of such loans have not yet been used for purposes within the company’s approved business scope. Furthermore, on November 9, 2010, the SAFE promulgated a notice on relevant issues concerning strengthening the administration of foreign exchange business, which requires the authenticity of the settlement of net proceeds from an offshore offering to be closely examined and the net proceeds to be settled in the manner described in the offering documents.

Violations of Circular 142 may result in severe penalties, including substantial fines as set forth in the Foreign Exchange Administration Regulations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the necessary government registrations or obtain the necessary government approvals on a timely basis, if at all, with respect to future loans by us to our PRC subsidiaries or with respect to future capital contributions by us to our PRC subsidiaries. If we fail to complete such registrations or obtain such approvals, our ability to contribute additional capital to fund our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could materially adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

These limitations could affect the ability of our operating subsidiaries in China to obtain foreign exchange through debt or equity financing.

The expiration or reduction of tax incentives by the PRC government may have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

The CIT Law imposes a uniform tax rate of 25% on all PRC enterprises, including foreign-invested enterprises, and eliminates or modifies most of the tax exemptions, reductions and preferential treatments available under the previous tax laws and regulations. Under the CIT Law, enterprises that were established before March 16, 2007 and already enjoyed preferential tax treatments (i) in the case of preferential tax rates, continued to enjoy such tax rates that were gradually increased to the new tax rates within five years from January 1, 2008 or (ii) in the case of preferential tax exemptions or reductions for a specified term, continue to enjoy the preferential tax holiday until the expiration of such term.

Zhejiang Jinko was designated by relevant local authorities as a “High and New Technology Enterprise” under the CIT Law, and it is subject to a preferential tax rate of 15% for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2014. We cannot assure you that Zhejiang Jinko will continue to qualify as a “High and New Technology Enterprise” when it is subject to reevaluation in the future. In addition, there are uncertainties on how the CIT Law and its Implementation Rules will be enforced, and whether its future implementation may be consistent with its current interpretation. If the CIT rates of some of our PRC subsidiaries increase, our financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

We face uncertainty with respect to indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC tax resident enterprises by their non-PRC holding companies.

Pursuant to the Notice on Strengthening Administration of Enterprise Income Tax for Share Transfers by Non-PRC Resident Enterprises, or SAT Circular 698, issued by the SAT on December 10, 2009 with retroactive effect from January 1, 2008, where a non-PRC tax resident enterprise transfers the equity interests of a PRC tax resident enterprise indirectly by disposing of